Join Up Dots Business Coaching Podcast

Introducing Layne Booth

Layne Booth is our guest today on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots business podcast. She is the CEO and Business Growth Strategist of The Project Booth, a business consulting company that uses proven metrics and data to bring business owners to the next level in their business. By strategically planning operations and creating a visual roadmap map, business owners can reclaim their time to focus on their business, make data-driven decisions, and capitalize on sales & profits. Data is key to everything, and unfortunately where most owners spend their time in the "lets hope this makes a difference" stage of business With her passion—and over a decade of “in the trenches” experience—as a guiding light, Layne ensures successful growth-minded business owners eliminate overwhelm by bringing clarity to help with teams, capacity and profits… and get back to running a business they love. How The Dots Joined Up For Layne As she says "I've witnessed business owners have incredible energy and focus for what they do, but seem like they don't have time to stop, and may feel like they are drowning in doing "all the things." We follow a simple ABC approach to drive amazing results: A is for Analyze: Analyze the numbers to tell the story. B is for Bottom Line: What do the numbers say about your actual profits, brand reputation, and customer service? C is for CEO Decisions: The secret weapon is creating a tool that CEOs actually use to make important decisions, not just creating another report. So do you need a ton of traffic to grow a successful business, or is that actually missing the point of business altogether? And what made her take the leap from her position of Forecasting manager for the VF Corporation and go it alone? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Layne Booth Show Highlights During the show we discussed such deep subjects with Layne Booth such as: We delve into the distinct difference between a CEO and an entrepreneur, and why so many people get very confused.  Layne shares how she built up her referrals based business by really nurturing her already built relationships. And lastly........... Why you simply have to understand the pain point of you customer, to then make that solution as simple as possible.

Direct download: Layne_Booth.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Introducing Steve Kahan

Steven Mark Kahan is our guest today on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots business podcast. Steve is a serial entrepreneur that has had great success moving from the corporate world early in his career to the startup world. He has successfully helped to grow six start-up companies from early-stage development to going public or being sold, resulting in more than $3 billion in shareholder value. He is currently CMO at Thycotic, which will become the seventh. Steve inspires teams and their organisations to take on the impossible and succeed. How The Dots Joined Up For Steve He has just written a book published by Wiley and Audible and available on Amazon.com called “Be a Startup Superstar." The book teaches those graduating college and young professionals how to earn a great living doing what they love by igniting their career at a tech startup. He will share lessons learned in over 30 years for how young professionals or those that feel stuck in the corporate world can earn a great living doing what they love by igniting their career in a technology startup. So is it harder than ever before to launch a successful startup due to the current conditions that we find ourselves in? And looking back at his ups and downs, were there things that he could have avoided or was this all part of the success? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Steve Kahan Show Highlights During the show we discussed such deep subjects with Steve Kahan such as: We discuss why people have to realise that even through the dark times in life, we see opportunities burst forth at the same rate as before Steve opens up about being a startup superstar, compared to what it takes to be merely successful. Why a startup operates like its the last outpost for outlaws, inspiring the mavericks and creatives of the world. And lastly........... Steve talks about why energy and protecting your time is so vitally important - basically be your own top priority in everything you do. Steve Kahan Books How To Connect With Steve Kahan Website Linkedin Facebook Instagram Return To The Top Of Steve Kahan If you enjoyed this episode of Steve Kahan why not listen to some of our favourite podcast episodes such as Spike Ball Founder, Nick Ruiz,  Sarah Caltieri or the amazing Mandy Barbee Or if you prefer just pop over to our podcast archive for thousands of amazing episodes to choose from. Full Transcription Of Steve Kahan Interview Intro 0:00 When we're young, we have an amazing positive outlook about how great life is going to be. But somewhere along the line we forget to dream and end up settling. Join Up Dots features amazing people who refuse to give up and chose to go after their dreams. This is your blueprint for greatness. So here's your host live from the back of his garden in the UK, David Ralph. David Ralph 0:25 Yes, good morning, welcome to Join Up. Dots. Thank you so much for being here. Wherever you are across the world. Some of you have been with us for over seven years now. Thank you so much for being here. Others have just joined in, but you've come at a good time you've come a good time because the things that are coming through Join Up Dots, a life changing for you. Well, today's guests on the show is a serial entrepreneur, but has had great success moving from the corporate world early in his career to the startup world. He has successfully helped to grow six startup companies from early stage development. going public or being sold, resulting in more than 3 billion in shareholder value. He is currently cmo at five Kotick which will become the seventh. Now he inspires teams and their organisations to take on the impossible and succeed. And he has just written a book published by wily and audible and available on Amazon called be a startup superstar. This book teaches those graduating college and young professionals how to earn a great living doing what they love by igniting their career at a tech startup, he will share lessons learned in over 30 years for how young professionals are those that feel stuck in the corporate world can earn a great living doing what they love by igniting their career in a technology startup. So is it harder than ever before to launch a successful startup due to the current conditions that we find ourselves in? And looking back at his ups and downs? Were there things that could have been avoided? Or was this all part of the success? Well, let's find out as we bring them to the show to start joining up dance with the one and only Mr. Steve Kahan. Steve Kahan 2:08 Hi. I'm doing great. David, how are you? David Ralph 2:11 I'm very well, thank you very much for being here on the show. I understand that you've got up at half past four in the morning, you're in Texas. What's happening outside your window? Is the weld getting going? Or is it still in lockdown? Steve Kahan 2:23 It is in partial lockdown, unfortunately. David Ralph 2:27 And what is the unfortunate part? Lots of people in the entrepreneurial world almost say it hasn't really made a difference to us. Steve Kahan 2:35 Well, it hasn't made a difference to a number of companies like ours or for me who's used to working remotely but there are a lot of people and businesses, particularly small businesses that are struggling. And you know, for that reason, when that occurs, and certainly there's impacts on people and on businesses as well. Well, that's, that is an impact that is negative and something that I wish that we all could could avoid. David Ralph 3:08 Now, of course, most people now are at least thinking to themselves, maybe maybe I should take some kind of control of my future with unemployment and redundancies soaring. Do you think that's a naive point of view? Or do you think that people really have got the opportunities nowadays to take control and start earning their own income? Steve Kahan 3:30 I think that you absolutely can take control and start earning your own income. And, and really, to me, I think there's never been a better time and in many respects, I mean, certainly I think I really think Winston Churchill said it perfectly. He said, a pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity and an optimist sees opportunity in every difficulty and so, you know, are you going to focus On the upside or the downside, do you see the cup is half full or half empty? And I really think that that positive optimistic people are certainly the ones that I choose to surround myself with. And my and I certainly believe that there are still many, many great opportunities, particularly to start a business or to join an existing startup and and take on some bigger, perhaps better funded companies and work with a small team of crazies that are hell bent on changing the world. I David Ralph 4:37 always remember I had a guest on the show and unfortunately, I can't remember the guest but I remember what he said. And he said, no matter how bad the world seems financially, somebody is getting the money. He said, it's just like an ocean where the tide has left your side and it's going to the other side, and it's your job as an entrepreneur to roll that boat across the Ocean to where that money is flooding in. And it is true, isn't it? Even at the worst times we're seeing zoom go through the roof, we're seeing bicycle sales go up massively. We're seeing so many people finding it boom time. Steve Kahan 5:15 I think that's true. And I think the key is is to find the sector sectors, as you mentioned that that are really going and going well for you mentioned some of them, I happen to work within the cybersecurity world and, and the hackers are out there almost like never before and so many businesses are looking to to do a better job of reducing risk. And so, you know, without question, there is many opportunities. There are people that are changing the way that they're working, working remotely, and that creates significant opportunity. So I absolutely agree with that. And, and and I am beginning to see people begin to capitalise on on some of those and, and think about ways to, to change the world. To me a great example of that is there is a new startup company that actually I'm considering investing and that is trying to change the way college students interact with businesses, where typically was face to face via career fairs, and then changing that interaction building more engagement and then facilitating the hiring process. I think, to me, that's a great example of a couple of young entrepreneurs that see an amazing opportunity and, and very well may change the way the world operates in terms of the college career experience. David Ralph 6:55 So let's turn the conversation to be our top superstar. Hold tight title, what actually is a difference that makes you a superstar and not just successful or getting by Steve Kahan 7:10 I think it starts first and foremost with choosing the right organisation or building the right startup organisation. And many people sort of don't understand the criteria of how to put yourself within a startup organisation that has a great chance to be successful. And there are, for example, certain criteria that I look at when I have joined startup companies and now I'm, I've been with six all of whom successfully sold or have gone public, generating over $3 billion. And now I'm with my seven that's like a rocket ship. And so to me, it's making the right choices and it starts with that. I look for Things like quality people who share the same values that I do. So if you don't trust, respect and admire the people that you're working with move on. I look for a concept that fills a big market need. I do the research and the homework to make sure that the market is big enough. I certainly understand that. People particularly now more than ever don't spend money on nice to solve problems they spend money on must solve. And I don't get dissuaded if there's too much competition, I I get dissuaded if there's not enough, I look for things like that. There's a great product that you can believe in where you can go to work every day with a passion for what the company creates and your role in creating it. And if you can't get behind it with enthusiasm, move on. And then finally, that the startup is well funded, and so that you are making sure that you're properly capitalised, so you have the best chance for growth and stability. And I think if you use those criteria to select a startup company, you have positioned yourself to have that opportunity to have a great outcome and be the superstar that you were meant to be. David Ralph 9:17 Now one of the things you say you look for a startup and you can't go on Craigslist and find these. So how do you find a startup for somebody out there who's interested? How do they actually find something before it's even started? Steve Kahan 9:31 So typically, what I will do is, is I I have started one company. And then the other companies that I have been with I have joined very small companies. And there are two ways that people oftentimes overlooked to find great companies. So one of which in most cities throughout the globe, there's what's known as startup accelerators or seed access. Raiders. And again, they exist in every city. You could do a Google and the city that you live in, and you'll find them and they are funding companies. They're providing educational assistance, networking opportunities and the like. And those organisations, posts, the companies that are members are ones that they're funding. And oftentimes there are great jobs right from those sites, right, and they're not the type of jobs that you're going to find posted. Secondly, is I will oftentimes, Reese research and be looking for startup leaders online or what I might read, I might start to follow them and I will make connections with them oftentimes through LinkedIn messenger in a heartfelt sincere way, not a salesy way. And what I've learned is that that type of direct connection First of all, All get you right to the executive. If there's HR at all it bypasses that. And then you can start to talk about how that person is achieving what they are within their career, you can learn from them, and bridge the conversation over to you. And oftentimes, again, if it's approached in the right way, you start to make connections with that person, and there may be opportunities within their company or within their wider network. And so approaching people directly online is something that sounds fairly basic, but you'd be surprised how rare it is actually done. David Ralph 11:45 Now, I know a lot of our listeners would say, it's alright for us, Steve, you've got a track record. You've got something to offer, but I'm starting out what value can I provide these people if I do connect with them directly? Steve Kahan 11:59 Yeah, I think that, you know, that's that's always the question. But the I think the the real thing to focus in on is there are over 80,000 startups around the globe. And, and there was a recent survey of startup CEOs that asked them the number one issue keeping them up at night. And it was actually finding good people. Now think of that for a second. So finding good, talented people was rated ahead of growing revenue, acquiring customers or gaining access to more capital. And so startup executives are desperate for hiring a plus talent. And so, you know, no one has all the experience perhaps that they think that they ought to have when joining an organisation and so oftentimes You know, sort of starts out with that connection. But then also, once you're bridging that conversation to you, if you're able to show some core traits, like for example, a willingness to work hard, someone who's super accountable, an individual who is team oriented, not an eye person, but a weak person, and you start to build, for example, that connection of the type of person that you are some of the background that you have, you'd be surprised how that connection could help bridge you into an organisation and then it really, it comes down to being a sponge, and taking on your own education and learning and building deep expertise. Because that's what the world pays the most for is deep expertise in one particular area. And then from there, building out your your your knowledge base. Since so oftentimes I find within startup companies rather than being in a smaller pigeonhole role, you get the opportunity to actually build that deep expertise. Because if you don't do the work, there aren't a bunch of other resources or people who can. And so it's oftentimes the perfect environment to achieve just that. David Ralph 14:22 Now, in your book, in chapter five, there's a whole chapter is at like a leader, even if you don't have the title yet. And you list great things to fall through and follow through on and one of them is keep your goals in sight. And the baby steps Tell us about that. Steve Kahan 14:43 Well, for me, I think it's super important to first of all, have your goals written down, right and so a lot of people when they talk about their goals, they they they don't have Have them in front of them. And I like to think of goals in terms of quarterly, in in terms of monthly, weekly and even daily, right. So it's that level of sort of detail that I will get into. And a lot of times, when you're thinking about those particular objectives, you also have to realise that not everything can be a high priority. And so, oftentimes, when you are documenting those goals, you'll find that high performers certainly as I saw myself to be, often take on massive workloads, right and to some extent, hard working people, it's they have traits that I respect, but it could create significant stress and burnout lead to burnout over the long haul. So you can't be a high performer without being overwhelmed. And so oftentimes, if you break down those objectives and two, kind of baby steps to get started. If you do a good job of prioritising your goals, what you'll find is is that success isn't about how much you do. It's about performing the right actions towards the right goals that will create the biggest impact. And for me, breaking things down into baby steps, oftentimes enable me to get started to not feel that the mountain is too big to climb. And then once I get started, then it's sort of like a snowball going downhill picking up steam. David Ralph 16:42 Let's listen to Jim Carrey. And then we'll be back with Steve. Jim Carrey 16:45 My father could have been a great comedian, but he didn't believe that that was possible for him. And so he made a conservative choice. Instead, he got a safe job as an accountant. And when I was 12 years old, he was let go from that safe job. And our family had Do whatever we could to survive. I learned many great lessons from my father, not the least of which was that you can fail at what you don't want. So you might as well take a chance on doing what you love. David Ralph 17:11 So when you were back in corporate land, and you decided to go your own way, did you know what you loved? Or was it just a feeling inside? Steve Kahan 17:20 It absolutely was a feeling inside I had a view of of what I love. But I remember that going from college into the corporate world. I remember staring at my bank statement and the pile of claims that I was supposed to process that day. And wondering, how on earth will I ever get ahead and I was working long days, and for me, the student loans would eat my paycheck before they ever even got a chance to hit my bank account. And so I sort of felt pigeon holed I felt like I In a big bureaucracy where there was great acceptance of the status quo, it was burdened by incumbent mindsets. The barriers to advancement seemed high. And it was like working at a on a giant ship that was hard to manoeuvre slow to change course. And, and for me, I just asked myself an important question. And that was, how could I earn a great living and love the work? I do? And it was really with that question that I realised that moving into more of a startup type of organisation would be the right career move for me. David Ralph 18:43 Now, what are people around you that said, Steve, what you're doing Steve, you've only got a beer for another four years and you've got the corner office. Steve Kahan 18:51 Absolutely. And, and so and then and then they went a step farther. The step farther was look, you know, this is risky if you make a move, it's certainly got great risk and, and there's not going to be the training and career paths that you typically would would see. And so what I learned was really what a startup was right. And so when people think of startups, you know, they they, they have sort of pictures in their mind's eye. But the way that I think of a startup there is a mentor of mine is serial entrepreneur. He's chairman of venture capital company by the name of Doug Irwin. And he says a startup is a company that operates like it's the last frontier for outlaws, a place where non conformists can live, create and sell their ideas. And to me how cool I mean, who doesn't want to be involved in that? It's sort of a place where you get to be the rough riding rebel, running circles around those slower moving bureaucratic, larger organisations. So what I came to learn was really that a startup is a culture. It's a mindset. It's not necessarily defined by the number of people. It's again, that small team of crazies just believing it could change the course of the world. That to me was exciting. David Ralph 20:20 Now, I was always told that I was a maverick in corporate world, like it was a bad thing. And I look back on it now, and I think it was a bloody great thing, and it's allowed me to go off and do what I need to do. Now the Mavericks, the creative thinkers, the strategy Guys, can you get the wrong blend in a startup when you walk into a startup? Can you see quiet, obviously, but they haven't got the right outlaws in place. Steve Kahan 20:49 Absolutely. Right. And so there are many attributes where you could see that they don't have the right outlaws in place. So Typically at startups, if you walk into a startup and you are seeing, like, for example, I'll focus of the values of the company in the cafeteria on a poster on the wall. That's not who startups are, they are living the values associated with with being a startup. You know, what you are often if you walk into a startup and you see that there that it looks like it's a pretty political bureaucratic type of environment where there isn't necessarily and the focus on the the end goal or the focus on on the customer and on beating what will most assuredly be tough competitors, then it's not the right place. If you see that the focus is more on competing internally with with one another and not on the whoever that particular enemy is externally, then it's not the right place. Right. And so typically at startups, it's, it's the opposite of that. And that and that's part of the work environment that I like, where there's great work, even versatility in the role that people are willing to stand up, you know, be accountable, you'll, you'll find that, that people have great persistence and tenacity, they're not going to be sort of overwhelmed by the obstacles that get in their way because they're most assuredly will be there. And then you know, finally that you see a culture where that people are embracing accountability, they want to be accountable to get the job done. And so those are like some of the things not to look for, as well as blending with a few of the things that I actually Look for within a startup that might be indicative that it could have a chance to win. David Ralph 23:06 And when does it become boring to you and you back out Steve Kahan 23:09 for me it I wouldn't say that it's so much boring but I like I do like some aspect of, of change and growth, I think that if if there is in time that it becomes boring, it's a time where you feel that the organisation or or me personally is not growing the way that it used to. Right And so, you know, if it's, if you if you are in a particular role and you're not able to, you know, grow within that role or expand and maybe take on some other roles within the organisation, if that's something that you that you aspire to do, or to move up, move into the C suite, hopefully someday, that to me, that's when it becomes a little bit less exciting. But, you know, again, if you believe the definition, at least that I mentioned that Doug Irwin had were a startup is really a culture, it's a mentality. I don't think that is necessarily, for example, the company I'm with now we've gone from 5 million to 100 million a cybersecurity company called Kotick. We've done that in four and a half years. And so it is not boring at all, even in the great growth that we have had and continue to have. Because there's such an opportunity for all of us and an opportunity for all of us to expand our skill sets. David Ralph 24:37 Now, as she was talking, I was googling on the entrepreneur handbook. And I can see that in the United Kingdom, there's 181, business accelerators, and that's just listed on that one website. So you really have shown but you literally step out your door and you trip over them if you're willing to look Steve Kahan 24:58 absolutely right. And so like, you know, if you go back at that criteria that I mentioned of how to select a startup, let me share with some of your listeners some of the questions that they ought to ask that will help them to figure out whether they're choosing the right one if they called one of those companies, and actually tried to break in. So if I were interviewing, these are some of the questions I would ask. I would ask questions like, why is now the time for your company to exist? Or a question like, what do you love about your team? And why are you the ones to solve this problem? Or tell me about a paying customer? What was their journey to you? And what are the revenue expectations over the next year? Or how much as the company raised and what's its runway? Who are your investors? Why did you choose them? And most importantly, this one is is one that kind of helps me get there. values. If you weren't building your startup, what would you be doing? which not only gets at their values, but you often find if you have other things in common with that person that you typically wouldn't find during an interview. If you ask those questions, you will go very far down your path to figuring out whether this is the right place for you. And you will differentiate yourself significantly because I can assure you other candidates for those same roles will not be asking those questions. Unknown Speaker 26:35 We're talking to Steve Kahan, the author of being a startup superstar, and we'll be back with him after these words. Are you ready to make a full time living online? Check out the amazing Join Up Dots business coaching. Unknown Speaker 26:47 Hello, my name is Alan. And I've just completed the excellent eight week course with David Unknown Speaker 26:51 before I started working with David Unknown Speaker 26:54 Actually, I had no idea at all where to start. Unknown Speaker 26:57 I had a lot of ideas about While I probably thought was going to be good business, David was able to help me through that though, to find that Unknown Speaker 27:06 passion. Within literally minutes. Unknown Speaker 27:09 We had, we had a business idea. And for the last seven weeks, Unknown Speaker 27:12 we've been building on it and building on it and the position I'm in now, Unknown Speaker 27:16 but if you've got an ever got here Unknown Speaker 27:17 on my own, because of the amount of information that David gives the structure, he's got the full package here, and he explains it in a way that I can understand. His support is phenomenal. I feel like this is the way business is supposed to work. Unknown Speaker 27:32 David helped me understand, okay, what were the next logical steps that I should do? How can I get this up and running? So I would really recommend this as an excellent course helping you if you have an idea if you have no idea, really teasing that out and some of the practicalities and steps to take to really launch your business, whether as a full time job or a side hustle. So it was really excellent. I recommend it for anybody thinking about setting up their own business. I don't think it's an exaggeration to say To save you years Unknown Speaker 28:02 Thank you, David for all your amazing help and support which keeps on going. And we certainly couldn't be where we are today without you. So you're awesome. David Ralph 28:12 So if you would love to become my next success story and have your own life changing online business following my step by step system, being tuned over many years to take away the effort and expense that others struggle with, then come across to Join Up dots.com and book a free call with myself. Let's get you living the easy life as it's there waiting for you to get it that is Join Up dots.com business coaching. Now we're talking to a Steve, the author of be a startup superstar. And interestingly, Steve within the book, the first few chapters, I thought, yeah, okay, I can totally understand where you're going with this. Very interesting at the end, you've got things like embrace the power of kindness and take care of what matters Put your family first work out, eat right sleep more. Why did you feel that it was important to add back into the contents? Steve Kahan 29:08 I think those things are hugely important. And you typically don't hear those types of things from in particular technology startup executives. But let me give you a very specific example why it's so important. And so, for example, when you take a look at sort of, you know, having a healthy work life balance and actually heard a phrase of, I almost don't even like work life balance any more, because it suggests that there's a right answer. I heard a term called work life harmony, which I liked a lot better because it suggests that things have been flowed. And so, you know, time for example, is a it's a finite resource. As we all know, once you lose it, you can't get a back and that means you must really exercise a lot of care in managing Your time and, and highly driven people, particularly those in the startup world often struggle with this. And what I've learned in my career and I didn't start out this way is to be my top priority. And to and if you live very much through your calendar, as I do is the most important item on your calendar. You are you priority number one. And so I'd like to challenge your listeners right now. And I'd like to ask them to open up their calendar and see if their calendar reflects that they are their own top priority. And I'll bet if you're like most people, if you check and see how many appointments you've scheduled with yourself that you have too few. And so, you know, think about some of the time that that you're losing for personal priorities, you know whether that's going to happen game being home for dinner or for breakfast. Or taking time where you're going to build your own skills, learn something new or to think strategically. What I learned was that if you're able to make yourself your own top priority, block out time in your calendar for you, that actually you're able to build far better work life harmony, and it's never perfect. And sometimes things need to change. But if you actually go start blocking off time on your calendar, even if it's for working out at launch, whatever it might be, so that you can proactively manage and orchestrate to the type of work like power money that you want to have for your life, that it just makes things better on all fronts

Direct download: Steve_Kahan.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov

Joins Us On The Steve Jobs Inspired Join Up Dots Podcast To subscribe to the podcast, please use the links below: Click Here to Subscribe via iTunes Click Here to Subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you like the show, we would be so grateful if would consider leaving the show a review in iTunes as well as Stitcher Radio.  A couple minutes of your time can help the show immensely!  Thank YOU! Introducing IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov Kirill Noskov is our guest today joining us on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots podcast. IAMRUNBOX was established in 2015 in Lund, Sweden, out of a love for travel and a passion for running. When our guest today Kirill Noskov started running to work in order to fit daily training into his busy schedule, he found it nearly impossible to pack his office attire without it getting wrinkled and creased on the way. Kirill set out to develop products that would promote being active every day in any weather, hold a laptop securely in place, and at the same time keep clothes wrinkle free. IAMRUNBOX was born. How The Dots Joined Up For Kirill  As he says "There are few things I am really passionate about - optimisation (we CAN always DO better), endurance sports and travelling. I like thinking positive, always looking for improvement opportunities and have been spending the last 8 years working with business development and optimisation in various shapes and forms. That is what drives me and can keeps me awake during the night. I am an endurance athlete and sport enthusiast, passionate about running and travelling. Running is my lifestyle: I run-commute to the office, take my running shoes whenever I travel, participate in occasional marathon competition or just enjoy a long run during the weekend. Travelling is my hobby what helps me to re-energise and gives a source of inspiration. My passion in running and travelling resulted in iamrunbox.com product to make travelling, training and work commuting experience just that little bit better. So it's ok ending up work without wrinkled clothes, but what about dripping with sweat and general stuff not suited for an office? And looking back was this a business that was always waiting for him to create, or was it just as hard to get it off the ground as most people find? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Kirill Noskov Show Highlights During the show we discussed such deep subjects with Kirill Noskov such as: Kirill shares how he came to the realisation that by creating Kirill actually became a better person. How social distancing is a natural part of the lifestyle in Sweden, unlike many parts of the world who are finding this a difficult change. We talk about the change that Kirill made in his life to both shift mentally and time-wise to create IAMRUNBOX And lastly........... Why it's not enough to build a good product, you have to get people to know about it on scale to truly grow the success you want. How To Connect With Kirill Noskov Website Linkedin Facebook Twitter Return To The Top Of IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov If you enjoyed this episode with Kirill why not listen to some of our favourite podcast episodes such as Spike Ball Founder, Nick Ruiz,  Sarah Caltieri or the amazing Mandy Barbee Or if you prefer just pop over to our podcast archive for thousands of amazing episodes to choose from. Full Transcription Of IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov Interview David Ralph 0:01 Once upon a time, there was a guy with a dream, a dream to quit his job support himself online and have a kick house live. Little did he know that dream would lead him into a world of struggle, burnout and debt until he found the magic ingredient and no struggles became a thing of the past. All right, of course I was that person. And now My dream is to make things happen for you. Welcome to Join Up Dots. Intro 0:27 When we're young, we have an amazing positive outlook about how great life is going to be but somewhere along the line we forget to dream and end up settling and Join Up Dots features amazing people who refuse to give up and chose to go after their dreams. This is your blueprint for greatness. So here's your host live from the back of his garden in the UK. David Ralph. David Ralph 0:52 Yes, hello there. Good morning, everybody. Good morning and welcome to Join Up Dots. Thank you so much for being here with us. Now if you're listening to this show sort of live lockdown has made me look out my window and see nothing more than people running, running everywhere or jumping onto bikes and getting their fitness in some way they can, but what happens when you go back to work and suddenly you haven't got as much time to get fit? Well, today's guest joining us on the show is the founder of I am run box which was established in 2015. In Lund, Sweden, out of a love for travel and a passion for running you say there's a connection to it. When our guest today started running to work in order to fit daily training into his busy schedule, he found it nearly impossible to pack his office attire without getting wrinkled and crease on the way. So we set out to develop products that would promote being active every day in any weather, hold a laptop securely in place, and at the same time, keep clothes a wrinkle free and I am one box was born. As he says there are a few things I'm really passionate about optimism as optimal ization we can always do better. It's probably optimistic as well enjoyment, sports and travelling. I like thinking positive always looking for improvement opportunities, and have been spending the last eight years working with business development and optimization in various shapes and forms. That is what drives me and can keep me awake during the night. I'm also an endurance athlete and sports enthusiast passionate about running and travelling. Running is my lifestyle. I run the commute to the office, take my running shoes where ever I travel, participate in occasional marathon competition, or just enjoy a long run during the weak hand Travelling is my hobby, what helps me to re energise and gives a source of inspiration. Now my passion in running and travelling resulted in I am run box and to make travelling and training and work commuting experience just that little bit better. So these are the questions it's okay ending up to work without wrinkled clothes but what about dripping with sweat and Jen will start not suited for an office and looking back. Was this a business that was always waiting for him to create or was it just as hard to get it off the ground as most people find? Well, let's find out as we bring them to the show to start joining up dots with the one and only IAMRUNBOX founder Kirril Noskov IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 3:20 Morning David, thank you so much for having me here. weather is beautiful in Sweden today. I have my morning jog and swim so nothing really to complain. David Ralph 3:30 Now I always think of this right because I live in a nice town. But I have people that come on the show and they say yes, I've just been running down the beach and I've been now my run would be quite rubbish. I just be running with buses going past me and cars going past me. Are you out in the country? Have you got trees or I used to live on quite city fied as well. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 3:53 I think it's a mixture of everything. You get both city you got a lot of nature and you Got a lot of See, then I wouldn't probably call it beach as we normally think of beach because the weather, I would say average during the year is 15 degrees. And that goes both to air and the water. But yeah, it's a lot of water. It's a lot of nature. And it's a lot of good opportunities to have a good job. David Ralph 4:22 Well, of course we're going to talk about your product, but I've got that big question. Okay. I would think to myself, it's okay running to work. I don't want to sit there all sweaty and overboard for the rest of the day. Is that something that isn't an issue? Do you have shadows and everything in your office? IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 4:39 And well I first started when they worked in Netherlands, and we didn't have a shower in the office. But then I just took a membership in a gym close by so I could the dark and unlit later half of stretching. Take a shower and kick off my day. Now when you look at I am run box okay? David Ralph 5:00 Let's start with a question I normally finish with but um, what is your proudest thought about the whole process? Is it what you've created? Or was it getting it off the ground? Or is it where you can see it going? IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 5:15 I think it's all started with a passion and a change because I first design product for myself to start running to work and carry my clauses. And and then I thought, yeah, it's it's it's a nice transformation what I got through consistent running and I became a better person I became more energised or happier. So I thought why not to do this product so other people can use it. And I just did it just for fun sake, as a hobby. So I created the product. I launched it. But then we sold over 1000 products within the first year with their marketing budget. And what's interesting happened I got a lot of people like me who didn't know how to start running to work, they bought a product. And they actually did started running to work. And they had the same personal transformation. And then they just dropped me back in line saying, Wow, thanks. It's really helped me and as that's, I think something would trigger and inspired me to start the company. David Ralph 6:23 Now I'm interested in that, that you knew that you became a better person. So were you were you somebody that would go up to old ladies and punch him in the face and you don't do that anymore? So how are you a better person? IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 6:36 Now I mean, maybe when I say better person, I'm more like healthy, more energised. I have a little bit more time for myself to think to reflect. I'm more efficient. So it's a more like that type of characteristics. But then of course, you also start Yeah, doing more sports and meeting with more people. I think all together, it just changes you in acid person then, of course some people say, Well, you don't know whether it's better or worse but in my eyes I think if you become more healthier, more happier, it is what I say about a person. David Ralph 7:24 And have you ever punched no person in the face when they're in the way you're running? And they don't they're not getting out of the way of you know, I haven't if you wanted to carry on, have you have you ever wanted to IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 7:39 you know, in Sweden, social social distancing is part of the culture. And before Khurana or, you know, people would normally cross on other side of the street. If you see someone coming your way so people avoid conflict. Pay interesting jumps. You don't need to punch anyone. No, but just David Ralph 8:04 jumping in there. So you've always social distance because we're in that phase at the moment because of the Coronavirus. That's something that is sort of natural in Sweden and isn't it? IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 8:14 Exactly, because I think the difference and that what, maybe a lot of people misunderstand when when when I read the global press what people say about Sweden, I didn't see them you get very high social responsibility. sense or feeling and yeah, and people just do it. So I think in the past if someone was sick, many people probably just stay at home and done, go to work anyway. Just so they don't, in fact, other colleagues and that's just a way of life. David Ralph 8:56 Now, I am run box net. Let's give an overview. For the listeners out there, so they're thinking, right, okay, I like to get to work. I'd like to get some fitness in, what kind of products could they get from you? First of all, that would instantly make them realise I'm coming back to this company, I'm going to buy some more stuff, what would be the first thing that I should go for? IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 9:18 I think what we are known for in our DNA is ROM commuting, and we probably have the best backpack in the world for running to work. And if you're running to work or running to gym or running as a means of transportation is something anyone interested to try? I would definitely recommend one of our products, which you don't even have to buy because they have a concept of renting the back but we have such a money back guarantee. So you can just try and see whether it worked for you or not. But then having Kadena in run commuting. Yeah, we realised that a lot of our costume where they're just active people and what we wanted was to go one step further and connect sport and fashion because it's a and when you run to work, you still use the same backpack later in your during the business, going out for a meeting at the office, and you don't want to look like a backpacker. So what we did, then we started building an hour around commuting story and created other backpacks for what our active people might need. So we have active commuting range, we have active every day with waterproof backpacks, and then we develop an active travel. At the same time now with all the COVID-19 situation. We wanted to support our customers around the world and we just launched a week ago active financial skeet where We redesigned the armband for runners, we created a shopping back where we took just a classic squarey recyclable shopping bag, but did it with fashion way and added straps. So the shopping experience is more convenient. And we launched a run mask, which is basically protection mask, which can be used both for running cycling in the city flying and again did it with style. So, there is quite a big range of products these days, which we and we have a vision to create products for for active people to inspire an active life and also try to embrace that change. Because David Ralph 11:53 what I love about these is you know, I've just turned 50 Yeah, I'm a half a century old and my lifestyle doesn't really fit in exercise because I have to go off and do exercise. But I love the fact that you're actually making exercise part of your day's routine. So it's not like if you come home and think, Oh, I gotta go off to the gym or I've got to do this. You're just naturally doing this. What's that? Um, the moment when you thought to yourself, hey, I've got a business idea what because that seems to me fundamentally, what your business is about making exercise convenient. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 12:30 Yeah, exactly. Because that's, that's what's basically the same or not the same happening with me. But when I work within the corporate environment, I barely could find enough time to do trainings and then you always say yourself, alright, tomorrow, I come back home and then they go to the gym, or go for the jog. But then again, after a long working day, you get tired and you get your family, you get your friends and then you start thinking Alright, should I go out and Have a beer with a friend or should they go to the gym and say exactly, exactly. But then what happens if you stop integrating sport in your daily life? Which again, it doesn't have to be running to work like now it's an example this morning. Yeah. Before coming to my office just to get ready for for for a podcast, I just took my running backpack I went for four kilometres jog, I had to swim in the sea. And, and then I kept to the car and came to the office. So I'm sitting stealing my running clauses, but then again, I take a guard back, come home, and I'm basically done with my exercises. And the only extra time I spent was those 20 to 25 minutes for Iran, and I would anyway need to go outside to pick a car. Try not to make it a little bit more efficient. David Ralph 14:03 Yeah, brilliant. Yeah, I've just bought a bike actually, because I thought to myself, Okay, I'm gonna get a bit of energy now I can't be bothered to run. I don't think it's me walking. I could long good walk, but for bicycle riding, that's gonna be good. And of course, when you were a kid, I don't know like in Sweden when I was a kid, we all had bikes nowadays, it's not so sort of like, common place kids don't really use it. But I thought to myself, I just got a bike I could do that. Even the slightest slope has been killing my legs. Now, with your experience, how long do I have to go through this pain so that I can just whip up a hill like I used to, and not think I'm gonna have to get off and push this. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 14:42 I think it's really a matter of consistency and maybe taking it slow, but it's not what you would neither with cycling or running. Start away doing daily. With a with a high mileage is because and don't you just gonna hurt yourself. So if you never run I would suggest starting with two three kilometres run couple of times a week David Ralph 15:08 starting starting with two or three that would kill me IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 15:12 that would kill me Then do one run one walk and cycling I think that again, it's just even if I don't run for months and then I would go for the first one two kilometres I would probably feel it in my lungs. So, again, it's probably it's all depends on the pace right because you can just start running a little bit faster than then you walk and it will be much better because the difference between again like experienced athlete and maybe less experienced on a distance is pace beat us. Boss can be extremely wasted. But if you experienced, you can probably do it much faster and for you to get tired, you really need to have a high pace. But then again, boss will get similarly tired. If, if you if you do the right patient treats here, David Ralph 16:18 I'm gonna, I'm gonna try my best I'm gonna try this, I'm gonna build up, I'm gonna, I'm gonna get rid of my car, which I've already decided and I'm gonna start cycling everywhere I can, because it's just, you know, as we say, it's about bringing fitness into your lifestyle and not making it something extra to do. You're having to do it to actually get somewhere. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 16:39 Exactly. This is good stuff. David Ralph 16:41 Let's listen to Oprah. Oprah Winfrey 16:42 The way through the challenge is to get still and ask yourself what is the next right move? not think about, Oh, I got all of this too. But what is the next right move? And then from that space, make the next right move and the next Right move and not to be overwhelmed by it because you know your life is bigger than that one moment. No, you're not defined by what somebody says is a failure for you because failure is just there to point you in a different direction. Now Oprah's David Ralph 17:14 talking about the next right move, but I'm interested with your first rights move. So you get this idea and this idea is probably going around in your head for quite a while thinking I've got to do something about this. Maybe I can go to the shops and buy some clothes that don't wrinkle. You go to the shops can't find any and so it comes down to you. What was your first right move? Looking back on Im run box. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 17:41 I would say it's a first right move was actually to start and quit the day job because it's all about making a change. And the rest is doesn't really matter big Yes, we Started with wrinkle clauses and books. And right now we are full scale active lifestyle brand, and a backpack company. And so what I thought it would be at the beginning is much different from it is now. But I did David Ralph 18:18 a job instantly Did you sort of had this decision, I'm going to go for this and quit your job. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 18:24 I would say first, again, I started as a hobby project. But then when I came into realisation that I don't want to have eight to five job and continue cooperate live and want to do something different. Then I took this decision and then actually when the company started being bored, boring and not when I just launched the first product because there is a big kind of mental shift you do. Kind of When when you do switch from corporate into actually becoming 100% on your own, you don't have a way back. David Ralph 19:12 Now I went through that as well. And I just got to that point when I thought I'm not happy, I just need to do this and get away from what I was doing. But were you happy with what you were doing? Because that's quite a quite a difficult one to sort of leave something that you're quite happy with, even if you've got a passion for something else. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 19:34 Yeah, I was actually extremely happy. And I was lucky enough to work in a global company where you could basically work in any country in the world and you have so many different things you can do and I always did something, what I really loved, I think, but then what I didn't was ability to work when I work wherever Where I want and when I want, right so I don't mind working. But I also like spending commands in ops skiing during the winter and I like maybe taking a month somewhere in Southeast Asia. And that's what corporate life cannot do. Again now maybe with the COVID-19 situation, the way people work will change, but you're still talking to the company and someone telling you what to do. And that's what's what what is different. The intrapreneurship David Ralph 20:39 because I'm, I do something similar. I actually take off a month at a time and just sort of close down the business. I'm very fortunate. I've created a business that I can turn off. And then when I come back clients are waiting for me, so it's quite easy. But the amount of entrepreneurs I speak to bat, say, ah, can I speak to you and I said, I won't be back for another month. Well, can I not connect with you within that time can and they just can't understand that you can do that. But they seems to still be one leg in the corporate world that they work to the weekend, had the weekend off and then come back again. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 21:17 Yeah, I would say for me, the way we structured the work that most of the things happens online, and a lot of work done through the video conferences and stuff like that. So you're not like really connected to any location. And then I seldomly turn off completely if I feel I need to, then of course I can, and I have a team who can back me up, but then when they take like more like longer months off, again, up to now, I think I didn't have really as this luxury to completely shut down. But I don't mind to take two three hours a day to make sure our business is growing and I support my stuff. David Ralph 22:03 So So why haven't you got that ability at the moment to just switch off because I speak to so many people, but I've actually said their business multiply 10 times when they stopped coming into the office when they went totally remote and big ideas just popped into their head because they were all relaxed and they were just focusing on on the sort of strategy without being within the business. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 22:28 I think it's two things here. One is my personal ambition ambition I'm, I really want to create a global company and global business quite quick. So we are a lot into exponential growth with more or less like purple ink revenue every year and that, of course, requires everyone in the team to work hard. Yeah, but second, I would say if I would ask I know how complicated is to build a backpack company, probably do something else. There's actually a lot of work that needs to be done. And we are not there yet. David Ralph 23:12 But but that's the same with all businesses, isn't it? You know, you start off with overnight EBT in the world. And then as you proceed through, I still say to my wife, I know more about what I don't know now, after seven years of doing this, then then what I do know that there's always another level that you can go down but you just can't comprehend at the beginning. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 23:38 Yeah, I guess it's, but but it's probably exactly as sad. But then, yeah, when you already have such an experience in the business within the corporate, then you exactly think that thing's gonna be easy. And then you have a plan that again to do something like within a year or two Then of course, you know it's gonna take longer. But yeah, I think it's, it's it's a mantle again, shift which you just need to go through that because everyone tells you by you still don't believe until you really do it. So that's why maybe when it comes to like money raising in fundraising, a lot of people within the equity market they look for a second or third time founders because then they know exactly what to expect. David Ralph 24:36 Because I speak to a lot of people career that come through to me and they want to start a business and I can show them how to start an online business that will operate and I've done it so many times now. But the hardest bit I find is that the people don't know what they're good at, or they don't know what they want to do. And they they kind of come with half baked ideas. with yours. It sounds like Like wrapped its arms around you it was part of your lifestyle and you knew that you were going to love this. That makes it so much easier doesn't it? IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 25:09 Well, I I thought I knew the direction which is basically I think the purpose from the beginning of the company wants to inspire an active life and actually try to change people through the active lifestyle so but and then I thought I would do it just making a box where you carry closes wrinkle free. Reality is again, it's not that sample and then we from the box, we went into the running backpack, then we went to other backpacks and then we realised we need to start has been the saturation range that that that that and that and that led us to where we are now. So I think doesn't really matter what your original idea is, as long as you Committed to do this. And then when you start spending 200% of your time thinking about it day and night, then your idea develops and then it might develops in to something completely different. But that's, I think, the most important. It's basically the full dedication and that you actually think about it, you build a team, and then you start building something together. David Ralph 26:31 And when you started off, it was just you it was just you sort of sitting there with the idea. Did you do the classic? Sit down with your mates in a pub and say to him, I've got this idea of about a business or did you keep it secret to yourself and start developing it behind closed doors. IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 26:49 And somehow I'm an open source guy, and I believe into transparency also When it comes to fashion and lifestyle, business, I think the most difficult is execution because it's not enough just to build a good product, you somehow need to make sure other people know about it and it's a lot about marketing, it's about the sales, then you have production supply chain customer service, a lot of elements and and that's that difficult and that requires spending time so that's not something what is easier to copy. And I was quite lucky that my wife supported me from the beginning and helped with a lot of like it, kind of the core of the company was a financial, operational parts and then we had an alignment on what and how we want to do so. At least I have the backing on the on the family side, then I also decided they took my NDA money and invest it into into the business, which gave me some startup capital. I took a bank, low loan to W DARPA. And then I started, basically, from day one when I worked full time. I already hired like, couple of students to help me out. So I got a team. But But then, of course, it was like, a year before that when I still worked within the corporate. And I basically had to do two jobs in one day, which was of course, grid complicated, David Ralph 28:39 is so important, isn't it to have your partner your spouse supporting you, more often than not, they don't understand why you want to do it. They don't understand because you know, life's all right. You've got a good job. You know, we're okay. What was it about the idea that she bought into was it just the way you looked at her with the pressure When you smoke, IAMRUNBOX Founder Kirill Noskov 29:04 I would say it was basically sharing the vision and one of the values we have in the company, which is freedom. Because if you want to achieve freedom, then corporate work is not something What? What you want to do and the only way is really to start something here on the one and that was more like a bigger idea what we thought you want to do because we bought like travelling, we don't mind working hard, but it might be we work at the evening or early in the morning or during the day and do something else in between. And again, having the flexibility to travel around the world and being in different places and do what you like. I think that something was inspired was a faff, and also what's up Because David Ralph 30:01 I was reading about Sir James Dyson, who's created the Dyson products global success, and he's the, the Britain's richest man at the moment. 13.2 billion he's been recorded. And he was talking about how he tried to create an electric car, but 500 million of his own money in and decided it was a failure. He couldn't do it. And they said to him, you know, were you scared? Were you scared of putting that kind of money? And he said, No, he said, When I started, and I ended up owning the bank, a million pound and I still hadn't really sold

Direct download: IAMRUNBOX.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Virtual Edge Founder Matt Clark Joins Us On The Steve Jobs Inspired Join Up Dots Podcast To subscribe to the podcast, please use the links below: Click Here to Subscribe via iTunes Click Here to Subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you like the show, we would be so grateful if would consider leaving the show a review in iTunes as well as Stitcher Radio. A couple minutes of your time can help the show immensely! Thank YOU! Introducing Matt Clark From The Virtual Edge Virtual Edge Matt ClarkVirtual Edge founder Matt Clark is today’s guest joining us on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots business podcast. He is the founder of The Virtual Edge and co creator of The Rainmaker System – an online marketing system that helps coaches, advisers and consultants get 2-5 high value leads per day from Linkedin without paying for ads. Matthew and his business partner Wesley Longueira have helped over 1000 businesses in 17 countries grow exponentially. Their 3 step approach places human connection at its core, paving the way for a new wave of lead generation marketing. They are a multi million dollar company and have helped their clients grow to six and seven figures without paid advertising. Now this isn’t something that occurred overnight. As with all stories on Join Up Dots there are a lot of dots to join up and that is certainly the case of How The Dots Joined Up For Matt I began in door to door sales and quickly became highly successful earning between 80-200k per month at just aged 19. I co-founded a telecom sales company at age 23 and grew that to more than 6M in sales by year 3. Instead of enjoying this success however I ended up completely burnt out realising that the business could not function without me. I knew that I wanted a different lifestyle- to travel the world, earn multiple currencies and to have more time to enjoy my life. That’s when I switched gears and began focusing on automation and developing systems that support business growth. I started consulting with businesses working on-to-one with big names on the global stage including Samsung, Loral Langemeier and Peter Sage. I soon came to realise that I wanted to have more impact. I know the only forward was further systematisation and automation. The success of the Rainmaker System has led to Matthew becoming a sought after international speaker and has shared the stage with big names like Dr. Phill, JT Foxx, Michael Douglas and many more. Matthew is also the author of The Proven Path, The Automation Playbook and The Automated Income systems and has been featured in Wake up- How to live a Healthy Vibrant Lifestyle. So is a thriving business as much as coming up with the idea, or overcoming the obstacles that always come our way? And why do so many people love to do the clunky spammy approach on Linkedin time and time again? Well lets find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots, with the one and only Matt Clark Show Highlights During the show we discussed such weighty topics with Matt Clark such as: Shares how every door that he knocked on over months and months and months gave him many of the skills that he uses today. Why we should dig deep into the online world to truly see what is available to us before we ever make a quick decision as to where we want to head. Matt shares the process of getting amazing leads from Linkedin by becoming truly focused on providing value, value, value. And lastly….. Why Jim Carreys amazing character Ace Ventura might just provide the greatest business advice the world has ever seen. How To Connect With Matt Clark Website LinkedIn Return To The Top Of Virtual Edge Matt Clark If you enjoyed this episode with Matt Clark, why not check out other inspirational chat with Caroline Casey, Festival Pass, Clint Arthur and the amazing Jessica Cox You can also check our extensive podcast archive by clicking here – enjoy

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Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Introducing Ben Krueger Ben Krueger is our guest today joining us on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots podcast. He  is a man who joins a very select band of entrepreneurs and businessmen who have made more than one appearance on the show. First appearing on the show on the 17th July 2014, he spoke passionately about his love for podcasting and his deep dive into the medium. Joining up the dots, it all started when he was penned up in an office working the dreaded dead-end job, and had to find something that would help him alleviate that daily feeling of boredom and dread.  So he resorted to listening to marketing and business podcasts, and as he listened, he started researching, and learning more about podcasting as a personal interest. How The Dots Joined Up For Ben This quickly grew into voracious research trying to uncover what made certain podcasts wild successes, and others a flop. So obsessed was he that he first created Authority Engine, which helped people become legends through the power of their voice. This has now pivoted into helping people start a podcast, or get theirs edited through Cash Flow Podcasting. When we last spoke he was living in Thailand as was an entrepreneur with a passion for the outdoors, travel, adventure, business strategy and podcasting. So is he still wearing the baggy shorts, and the sunglasses or has he settled down and watched his efforts grow his business? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Ben Krueger Show Highlights During the show we discussed such deep subjects with Ben Krueger such as: Why a product that is too different even if its brilliant, more often than not wont get legs and gain traction. Ben shares a great story about a photography business in the UK, who niche down on every website they have online. We discuss how the clarity of a business is an evolution, and more often than not will become visible straight away. And lastly........... Why all business owners must focus on the value proposition of the perfect customer time and time again to truly find success. Ben Krueger Books How To Connect With Ben Krueger Website Linkedin Facebook Twitter Return To The Top Of Cash Flow Podcasting If you enjoyed this episode of Ben why not listen to some of our favourite podcast episodes such as Spike Ball Founder, Nick Ruiz,  Sarah Caltieri or the amazing Sam Bearfoot Or if you prefer just pop over to our podcast archive for thousands of amazing episodes to choose from. Full Transcription Of Ben Krueger Interview Intro 0:00 When we're young, we have an amazing positive outlook about how great life is going to be. But somewhere along the line we forget to dream and end up settling. Join Up Dots features amazing people who refuse to give up and chose to go after their dreams. This is your blueprint for greatness. So here's your host live from the back of his garden in the UK, David Ralph. David Ralph 0:26 Now, good morning to you. Good morning, everybody. everywhere across the world. Do you ever sit there laying in bed or maybe in the bath and think to yourself, that guy who was on episode 88 of Join Up Dots back in 2014? I wonder what happened to him. Do you ever do that? Well, I know I do. And I'm glad I'm going to actually find out because today's guest is a man who joins a very select band of entrepreneurs and businessmen who have made more than one appearance on the show now first appearing on the show on the 17th of July 2014. As I said he spoke passionately about Lots of podcasting and he's deep dive into the medium. joining up the dots. It all started when he was penned up in an office working the dreaded dead end job and had to find something that would help him alleviate that daily feeling of boredom and dread. So he resorted to listening to marketing and business podcasts. And as he listened he started researching and learning more about podcasting just as a personal interest. Now, this quickly grew into a voracious research trying to uncover what made certain podcasts wild successes, and others a flop. And so obsessed was he that he first created authority engine, which helped people become legends through the power of their voice. This is now pivoted into helping people start a podcast or get theirs edited easily through cash flow podcasting. Now when we last spoke, he was living in Thailand and was an entrepreneur with a passion for the outdoors, travel, adventure business strategy and podcasting. So the question is, Is he still wearing the baggy shorts and the sunglasses He's always he settled down and watch these efforts grow into a fully fledged business. And why do so many people fail at podcasting when it's such an amazing medium to connect with people, and people are listening more and more every day? Well, let's find out as we bring them to the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Mr. Ben Krueger. Ben Krueger 2:25 I'm doing great. David, thank you so much for having me back. It's, it's bringing it all back bringing it all back a couple years now. David Ralph 2:32 I know I haven't changed back and I'm still doing the same old routine that I've been doing for six years. And that actually leads into a good question. I wasn't going to ask you that question. But do you think we've podcast the ones that do really well is because there's a kind of familiarity kind of people know what they're going to get. I remember hearing the producer of police academy films. Do you remember the police academy films back in the day? And oh, yeah, they got up to like police academy nine He said, the real thing to make something successful is give people what they liked about the one before, but make it different. So they come back. So that familiarity. Do you think that's what makes a podcast successful? Ben Krueger 3:14 I mean, I think that's one of one of many routes because yeah, you you as a podcaster. No. And anybody out there like all the podcast is, is recorded audio. So at the end of the day, there's so many different things you can do with the medium. But I like that, you know, if you tapped into a vein, where people are really engaged, people are really connected. And you give them more of that. Just with different stories, different people's experiences, like your show is a perfect format that doesn't need to be changed every episode because it's about people's stories. It's about the dots in their in their experience that have linked up to create who they are and who they're becoming. So it's this It's this interesting format that, you know, if somebody tried to apply the same format to something that was a little bit more different, you know, it's like an evolving news or something like that you could use the same kind of rough format so that people again, like you said, know what to expect. But there's got to be, you know, there's got to be something new going on there to bring them back and keep them interested. So I think there's definitely two sides to that coin, but I like because with these types of format of shows, there is newness, but it's in the same format. So you get, you get the same value delivered over and over and over again. You get the same type of entertainment, but it's new and it's fresh, because it's new people, new stories and new and interesting things going on. So yes and no is my gloriously refined answer there. Well, I'm David Ralph 4:55 gonna throw it to another level now because I was listening while I was watching So Scott, and I've been talking about it for over lockdown that we're in at the moment. There's some good content that's being produced. And there's some bloody awful content. And the one that I do like is some good news sGn network by john Wright and I just like that he's 1625 minutes. And I was watching it today. And he had Oprah Winfrey on any air to Steven Spielberg. And obviously, he's got a good network, but he can sprinkle the Stardust across. But it's format. It's the news. And I thought to myself, it's interesting, actually, we like the way it's happening. Because it's how we know. We know that the news, as I used to do training courses many, many years ago, and I always said, Tell them what you're going to tell him, Ben, tell him and Ben, tell them what you told him. And that was basically how you summarise the training goals. But news is exactly the same. They tell you what's in the news. And then they give you a bit more about it and then a summary at the end. And once again, that's gone off like a rocket because it reads Is that Amelie ality You know, I'm really interested in this pain. I wasn't going to speak to you about this because I hadn't thought about it. But I wonder if products and services are more likely to find legs because they're similar to something out there more than somebody trying to create something brand new. Ben Krueger 6:19 Yeah, well, it's that classic, you know, the the innovators kind of dilemma where, what what has been shown time and time again with different products with different services with different things. If something's too different from what currently is, even if it's significantly better. It's too big of a leap of faith for people to take, because there is there wasn't that like stair step in between. Whereas if it's a little bit better or a little bit different or a little bit improved, and a little bit refined, that tends to be my much more More resonant product or service or show. And so I see that all the time with shows that are trying to be too creative. Like they kind of they're, they're too out there. So they don't even, they don't really connect with people because they people can't draw a connection between what they think of as a podcast and what this thing is that they're trying to listen to. And it doesn't really doesn't really Join Up Dots as it were. So it's an interesting dilemma, where it seems to be and I think it's a little bit of a human nature thing. We want to know what we're expecting, or we want to have some idea of what we're looking at and what it is. So if it's a little bit too far out there, it's too different. It's going to be hard for us to track and hard for us to really engage fully without having that judgement piece. I think that's a big part of it. David Ralph 7:57 So if we go back in time law He was with us you were talking about your business authority engine. And what I loved about that at the time, and I remember I was very new in the game. But I remember having some kind of deep connection to the fact of biscuit. I didn't just throw it out. But he became an expert. He did the work. He did the research and a poverty engine, I thought was going to be your legacy work. It just seemed to be fulfilling a need at that time, is now pivoted to cash flow podcasting. Why Why did you change it? Ben Krueger 8:33 Yeah, good question. We we found over time working with folks that our specialty really came in as working with established businesses that were trying to use podcasting as a way to engage their audience to build you know, their authority and their network in their industries, to uplift their industry and at the end of the day, as well to generate clients and And revenue for their business. So, you know, there's a tonne of ways people can use podcasting, there's a tonne of different types of podcasts and categories of podcasts. But we really found that was our sweet spot is helping businesses, you know whether coaching online services SAS, you know, financial advising all those kinds of businesses use podcasting as a way to transform their audience over time, through trusting relationships, through results in advance in educating through their content into folks who are really great prospects and really great clients for their brand. So that's kind of where that transition came in. And a lot of the core elements are still there. It really just came down to a refinement of who we can add the most value for in terms of clients because we could work with all types of different podcasts. We have really found that's our sweet spot. We talk about that time and time again on Join Up Dots about online business is simple. And I Keep on drumming this in because I want people to understand that is simple, you've got to have something that other people value, it's got to either solve a big problem or move them into an increased level of status or pleasure point. And then focus in on that one person and just do that. And it's almost better if you've got a great idea to have like nine different customer bases, but just speak to that one customer in each of the portals. So create a website just for that customer and then another one just for that customer. And I speak to people and I say oh, no, no, no, I just want one business like oh, yeah, one business is brilliant. Let's try to get one business but let's try to get one customer that really buys big. Learn what works from that and then sort of rinse and repeat because it is easy isn't a pain once you've done it's it's the it's the classic Like be a big fish in a small pond or the air of a small town versus, you know, trying to trying to swim with the sharks. You know, I one great example of this that I really like and I've heard a couple other people bring up over time is a it's a it's a photography company out of the UK that does product photography. So they have two websites that I'm aware of and they may have other ones but one is we shoot bottles so you know it's it's product photography of anything in a bottle and we shoot cans to totally different domains they don't refer to each other at all. But it's the same company they pretty much use the exact same setup because cans and bottles are pretty similar from a photography standpoint, but I love that it's so special. Each one is so specific. So if you've got you know a product that comes in a bottle and you find out about we shoe bottles, calm boy does that sound like the right fit or not. David Ralph 12:00 And so many people out there think that they're gonna miss out open don't they think if I go for everyone they're gonna miss out and you can go as niche as you want. And I remember people used to say the riches are in the niches and they you know it doesn't work over the UK because we say niche but I like that niche and rich and I used to think really really bad is true is so true you can go too wide but you can't go too deep. Ben Krueger 12:27 Yeah, it's that classic when you've heard the same advice too many times you almost don't trust it cuz it seems a little cliche, but it's absolutely true. And we've found for for podcasts, and particularly for ones that are are trying to you know, they're they're creating a podcast community around a brand around a product or a service. We have found this this idea of niching down as if you can with your content you saw One main problem for one core group of people. So a perfect example of this is like a gal. We work with Katrina Ebell, she's got a podcast called weight loss for busy physicians. I mean, it couldn't be more specific and more directed, she solves one problem for one group of people. And so with that, her podcast really, really resonates for those folks that that fit in that space. And there's more people in that space then she can actually work with, she's been sold out for a while. So it's that classic. You know, if you try to be everything to everybody, you're gonna have a hard time getting traction, whereas if you can be the mayor of that small town, everybody in that small town knows you they share. You know, they talk about you with their neighbours like that that whole town knows who you are and what you're about and how you can help them out. Now with your David Ralph 13:54 tagline, I suppose on their podcast services, the busy thought leaders, I was looking And earlier, and I'm very much into trying to explain a business in four to five words that really say what your service is podcast services for busy thought leaders. Ben Krueger 14:14 Well, the fun part is we're in the process of a complete upgrade and how we communicate our our services. So the the new thing that we're moving towards or the new way we're describing how we do what we do, is we make podcasting easy. Yeah, that's really it, isn't it? Yeah. And that's with the caveat that you know, someone is in in kind of the verticals that we can help the most, but at the core foundation of it. That's what it's all about. Because when when we first started this whole process of helping people, create, plan, create and launch podcasts for their business We're actually working with a gentleman, who at the time, I had only been doing podcast production, I had helped out on some launches. But I had a gentleman come to me and say, you know, I want to start a podcast for my brand. I've got an online paid community. I don't have the time. I don't know what I don't know. And I want to do it right. Help me out. So what does that look like? So we work together to figure out what is this process where he can just show up as the host. And we can have a process and a team that supports him in just doing that. So really, what it comes down to over time is we make podcasting easy. And, you know, I always like to add on the little, you know, because I can't just leave it as simple as possible. We make podcasting easy and effective because at the end of the day, if it's not working for a brand or if it's not working in contributing to the goals that the host wants it to do, then what are we? What are we even doing? So I'm a big fan of start with the end in mind and make it easy and as simple as possible. effectiveness does not have to be complicated. David Ralph 16:16 Yeah, I agree with you totally. And I love the word easy. If you go over to Join Up Dots, my tagline is we make getting your own successful online business easy. And I saw one the other day, which is lawn care made easy. You know, in four words, it says everything that it does, and but that ability to have that kind of clarity in your own business. Is that something that people should get right at the beginning, or should they grow into it because I come to it from two different sides. I can do it for other people, but I wonder whether the actual evolution is part of getting that simplicity and clarity Ben Krueger 17:00 Well, I can definitely say I would have loved to be able to start with that clarity. But I can definitely say from a personal standpoint, like our message has shifted and changed and evolved and refined and gotten more and more simple over time. But I know my personal tendency is to say 10 words when three words will do yeah, so that David Ralph 17:23 I know that problem. Ben Krueger 17:25 Exactly, exactly. I think I think all of us talkers tend to have that challenge. But I think you know, it depends on where you're at. And I think what it really comes down to is the simplicity of the messaging comes from a deeper understanding of, of the space and of either the problem you're solving or you know, the the benefit that you are sharing with folks because the more you understand that space, their needs, their psychographics why it's important to them, the More you can simply communicate it. So if you are, you know, let's say you work in, in a industry for 20 years as an employee, or you know, in part of a different company, and then you strike out on your own, you've had 20 years to figure out what that industry is all about what's important to people, you know, and so you can, I think it'd be much easier to start with some super clarity. Because you know, the space you understand what's going on. Whereas if you are just getting into an arena, into a vertical into an industry, there's gonna be some time as you kind of get grips on what's going on, and what's important to people. And, you know, just because it's important to one doesn't mean it's important to others. So you got to kind of find where those sweet spots are. So I think it's a natural evolution. But it comes with an understanding of what the pain points are, what the challenges are, what the outcomes are, what the hopes and dreams are of the folks in that space, David Ralph 19:01 let's hear from Oprah. And then we'll be back with Ben, Oprah Winfrey 19:03 the way through the challenge is to get still and ask yourself, what is the next right move? not think about, Oh, I got all of this stuff. What is the next right move? And then from that space, make the next right move, and the next right move, and not to be overwhelmed by it. Because you know, your life is bigger than that one moment, you know, you're not defined by what somebody says, is a failure for you. Because failure is just there to point you in a different direction. David Ralph 19:35 Now, have you had failuress? Because from my side of the fence, and I've connected with you a couple of times, and we've known each other for years, but we hardly know each other at all. But it's always seemed like you had persistence. You were somebody that was going to follow it through. And so have you actually had babies or have they just been sort of learning learning opportunities for you? Ben Krueger 19:59 Oh, I think Yeah, any anybody that says they haven't had failures, I think I think might be sweeping some things under the rug. And not that you can't take them and see them as learning experiences and step into the other side. But I've absolutely had some some failures. So one, one particularly tasty one is for a while, you know, I got into entrepreneurship with only having worked a few jobs and marketing all for a couple of months at a time. So I think I was I was an employee through I think I bounced around to four or five different companies over the course of about three years total. And then when I and then I went into starting my own business, but no, I didn't know what the heck I was doing. I had no idea how to manage a team or build a team or do it all myself or manage, you know, the finances of a company. So I think one of the one of the biggest learning opportunities for me, which at the time I definitely saw as a failure and really frustrated me was I did not know how to manage cash flow within a company, which is kind of funny seeing as we're now called cashflow podcasting, but this was also before the branding change. So essentially, we were we had a year where we just lost money because I was doing a lot of investing in growth in big ideas in shiny objects. And I was not paying attention to the bottom line I wasn't paying attention to like having stair step growth of just, you know, looking at the next piece and then the next piece as Oprah just, you know, so eloquently put it I was trying to skip steps and in doing so, Got the company into debt and not in a healthy way and I ended up having to let go of a key team member who and absolutely done an incredible job up until that point you know arguably better than me and it was it felt like a massive failing because I had I had not made decisions in the company that were intelligent around money in that I could could essentially keep employing him and so I had to essentially really tighten tighten about pulling the drawstrings relearn and understand like okay, how do I go from I'm losing money every single month to I need this to be profitable and not from some maniacal you know, laughing on top of my you know, pile of gold coins mixed, you know, Mix Scrooge type of thing. But for any venture to actually contribute and survive, it needs to be profitable. So that was a serious what felt like a huge failing at the time. And sometimes depending on how I'm feeling in the day, it can still feel like a giant failure. But it it was absolutely a learning curve and led me in a direction that now I feel like I've you know, got a really solid understanding for what needs to be in place financially for the company to do well. And I've put in systems in place so that when I'm when I start to you know, if things start to shift in a way that it's not supporting us and along in the long term financially, then I've got some early red flags and warning so I don't find myself in that position again. David Ralph 23:53 It's personally my biggest failing was obsession. I was obsessed and overwhelmed. And just I just grow, drove myself into knees and there's many different references of my journey on Join Up Dots that you can go back to. But my number one learning that I learned was it's better not to work on a business plan to work on a business. All my great ideas come up when I'm on vacation, or sitting in the garden, more than just being in front of a computer slogging away for hours on hours thinking that it's going to be genius. And a lot of stuff that I've done in the past. I look at it and I think it failed because there was a desperation in it. I there was a lack of clarity in it. I don't think I was totally believing in it. So it was just kind of a shadow of what it is now. Anybody that comes to me now, they get value. And I absolutely go to bed with you know, a clear conscience and I will sleep better than anybody. But in the early days, when I was trying to get it going. I think it was kind of half baked because I didn't have the journey, I think you've got to have the journey, which is why it's so important if somebody is starting a business to start with your current knowledge base, because then you've only got half the learning the entrepreneurial side is quite difficult to learn. But at least you start with something that you already know about. Ben Krueger 25:23 Yeah, and I think this is this reflects actually pretty accurately on on one of what I would consider my biggest failings as well as, for the longest time in business. Like I, when it comes down to it, I made it about me. I made it about what I wanted, like how I wanted the business to support my lifestyle, what I wanted to do and what I didn't want to do, it was it was very, you know, kind of, if a if a, you know, five year old was having a tantrum, and you know, it's about me, they don't get to have their nap time or you know, whatever. Yeah, it's It's a little bit of that, that going on. And it's not something I'm super proud to admit, but it's absolutely true and what I've, what the primary shift has been in, it's kind of the scarcity versus abundance mindset. Like if you're in a mindset where you you are doing okay, then you have the ability to give back. Whereas, if you feel like you are just scraping along and you're, you're in that hustle and grind, and you've got to get it's very, you know, get focused. So I think the big shift for me has been trying to and transition and stay in the place of contributing as much value as I can through our products and services through you know, all the content and things that we we create and at the same time, I think that that reflects our into how I interact with our team, how I interact with clients and customers, how I interact with referral partners and that kind of thing, because, you know, I'm not showing up to get in, in kind of on the flip side of that same coin when I'm showing up to figure out how can I highlight other people's genius and and partner with people in a way that's collaboratively expansive, as opposed to how can I do it myself to save a few bucks. And obviously, there's some realities here to where you need to, you need to be have the chequebook balance at the end of the month, but there's a lot of ways to partner with people and to contribute value without it necessarily being $1 and cents expense. So I think that's a big shift that you know, and to be honest, it's something that I have to work on. So just like any of these kind of things, it's Oftentimes not a snap your fingers and you were this yesterday and now you're this today. But I see it as like that's my area of continuous development and growth is how can I come from a place of giving of love of care and abundance? And the more I do that, the more the more things just seem to get easier and easier. David Ralph 28:26 We're talking to Ben Krueger from cash flow podcasting, and we'll be back with him after these words. Unknown Speaker 28:34 You ready to make a full time living online? Check out the amazing Join Up Dots business coaching. Hello, my name is Alan. And I've just completed the excellent eight week course with David before I started working with David Actually, I had no idea at all where to start. I had a lot of ideas about while I probably thought was going to be good business, David was able to help me through that though, to find that passion. Within literally minutes, we had, we had a business idea. And for the last seven weeks, we've been building on it and building on it. And the position I'm in now, I don't think I've ever got here Unknown Speaker 29:10 on my own because of the amount of information that David gives the structure. He's got the full package here and he explains it in a way that I can understand. His support is phenomenal. I feel like this is the way business is supposed to work. David helped me understand, okay, what David Ralph 29:26 were the next logical steps that I should do? How can I get this up and running? So I would really recommend this as an excellent course helping you if you have an idea if you have no idea, really teasing that out and some of the practicalities and steps to take to really launch your business whether as a full time job or as a side hustle. So it was really excellent. I recommend it for anybody thinking about setting up their own business, or both. It's an exaggeration to say David will totally save you years. Thank you, David for all your amazing help and support which keeps on going And we certainly couldn't be where we are today without you. So you're awesome. So if you would love to become my next success s

Direct download: Ben_Krueger.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 7:07am UTC

Mandy Barbee is our guest today joining us on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots podcast. MA Economics & CCHT, founder of Palladium Mind, a transformation and healing expert who has helped hundreds of clients across the globe to overcome anxiousness and thrive in business, health, and life. By combining the power of imagery with their innate capabilities, she empowers men and women to regain a positive sense of control, transcend struggle, and enjoy everything more. Now that's what she does everyday, but at Join Up Dots we are more interested in how she got to where she has, not what she is doing. And her journey is one that can inspires so many people that struggle with the mental side of moving to where they want to be. How The Dots Joined Up For Mandy  As she says "I’m the oldest of five girls, all born inside 7 years to very young parents. Raised in north Georgia, I knew a couple things very early on: I wanted to see the world, and I wanted to support myself. Neither of my parents had completed college, so when my father told me, “Mandy, any school you can figure out how to get into, I’ll find a way to pay for,” a quiet voice inside of me said, “That isn’t what’s going to happen.” Determined, smart, polite and ambitious, at the age of 17 I was accepted into the Air Force Academy and headed to Colorado Springs for boot camp. I had poor self esteem, weak boundaries, and an insatiable need for external validation. And so while I excelled at everything I did, and was graduating at the top of my class, in the winter of my final year, all coping mechanisms were breaking down; I found myself in tears seemingly without reason and missing classes for the first time in my life. Coincidentally over Christmas my mother had bought my dad a session with a hypnotherapist to stop smoking, and for lack of us knowing what else to do, I went for a visit as well. THAT HOUR I SPENT WITH A GENTLEMAN HYPNOTHERAPIST IN NORTH GA, 2005 PUT MY LIFE ON A NEW TRAJECTORY - ALBEIT AT THE TIME I DID NOT APPRECIATE EXACTLY HOW. Fast forward ten years, 26 countries, and leadership roles in three commercial industries later, I had objectively achieved a great deal of success and every reason in the world to be happy. So why did those high marks in classes, and educational achievements force her to review where she was heading in her life? And is anxiety something that we can nip in the bid before it ever starts, or simply something we have to manage? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Mandy Barbee Show Highlights During the show we discussed such deep subjects with Mandy Barbee such as: We discussed why we should all be very aware of the energies that we give out everyday, especially to the wrong people. Why Dunbar's law is so powerful which states that we can only maintain 150 relationships at everyone time. Social media cleanse anyone? Why when we rest our minds and our bodies we really give ourselves a chance to grow our business faster than ever And lastly........... How the world is full of traffic streams, which makes it so easy to find customers for our business. We simply have to decide where to put our rods.

Direct download: Mandy_Barbee.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Todays episode of Join Up Dots is a question and answers session which touches on motivation once again.

As you will hear on the show, one of the hardest things to conquer in your life is finding the motivation to keep moving forward. I know for sure that I struggle with this, especially when I have had a break from working on something,

Then its like a real drag to get going again, But you have to get going and do the work or it will never get done.

So what are you going to do to make it all come true for you?

 

Direct download: MOTIVATION_MAY.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Stephen King is our guest today joining us on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots podcast. He is a top executive at a Fortune 500 company. Bootstrapped CEO. Venture- backed tech startup founder. Non-profit fundraiser. It’s safe to say Stephen King is not your traditional CPA. Stephen is President and CEO of GrowthForce, one of the nation’s largest providers of outsourced bookkeeping and controller services. Regarded as an industry thought leader by AICPA and CPA.com, his ability to visualise the future of accounting has lead GrowthForce to become one of the fastest-growing companies in America. How The Dots Joined Up For Stephen His experience at the forefront of technology development and accounting system design spans nearly three decades. In 1995 he founded Virtual Growth, the nation’s first cloud-based accounting service, and quickly grew it into a market leader. After being acquired by Insperity, Stephen was brought on as president of Insperity’s Financial Management Services division, serving two years before leaving to build GrowthForce. He also spent seven years working at Amnesty International USA—first overseeing 300% growth as CFO, then raising over $20M a year as Director of Development. Stephen’s time at Amnesty reinforced his life-long commitment to giving back to the community. As a result, non-profits represent 35% of GrowthForce clients. So where does his true passion lie, in the quick moving startup world, or working for major corporations often with less than movable parts? And are we now at the start of the next industrial revolution, whereby we will see more and more people start their own businesses? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Stephen King Show Highlights During the show we discussed such deep subjects with Stephen King such as: Stephen shares how people are changing their systems everywhere to simplify their businesses due to the pandemic. Stephen talks openly how he started the first cloud account and the steps he took to make things happen from scratch. Why our next generation of children are under such a strain to achieve the same level of success as their parents. And lastly........... We hear the story of Stevens family origins and how his Father  changed his life with just $47 and a boat ticket.

Direct download: Stephen_King_Master.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 10:05am UTC

Introducing Shift Financial Founder Spencer Sheinin

Shift Financial founder Spencer Sheinin is our guest today joining us on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots podcast. He  is a man who is taking the stress, pain and quite frankly annoyance out of one of the worst things about being in biz. Yeah we all know that part of the year when we start getting letters through asking for the paperwork that you can't find. And then it asks "how much did you earn last year, and you realise you have to work out the expenses to then take it away from the income"...nightmare. As he says "If you’re like most entrepreneurs, you probably hate accounting. The information your bookkeepers and accountants bring isn’t at all understandable or helpful, and you know you’re not getting the information you need to run your business. You’re stressed, fed up, and even embarrassed about the state of your books. But you don’t know how to make things better. One thing is certain: you can’t afford to spend time learning accounting—nor would you want to. How The Dots Joined Up For Spencer Sheinin As founder and CEO of Shift Financial Insights, his company provides ridiculously simple accounting and insights for businesses on the rise. Spencer loves sharing his knowledge as an instructor at the Chartered Professional Accountants of British Columbia (CPABC) and has spoken all over North America about why entrepreneurs shouldn’t fear their books. To be honest this is a man that looks like he doesn't fear anything as when he isn't knee deep in ledgers and spreadsheets, he is also an endurance sports enthusiast and has completed several ultra-marathons, IRON-MAN triathlons, and marathon swims. So when did he start to realise that instead of working for a major corporation it was time to go out on his own? And why do people struggle so much to keep things organised when running their online ventures? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Spencer Sheinin Show Highlights During the show we discussed such deep subjects with Spencer Sheinin such as: Why Spencer always gives the advice of outsourcing your accountancy issues as soon as possible when starting out in business. Why we should view having an accountant as going to the right Doctor for the right specialist advice. Choose the expert you need for the right task. Spencer reveals his "Why" for his business, and man has he knocked this out of the park on this one. Spine tingling stuff. And lastly........... Spence gives us a list of the big questions that we must all ask our accountants to make sure we get the gem.

Direct download: Spencer_Sheinin.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Michael Cavallaro is today's guest on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots business coaching podcast. Michael's 40 years of experience have culminated into the creating Human Cosmology™ a belief, behavioural & communication personal growth process. Human Cosmology™ is a unique and comprehensive life changing modality. This modality allows for deeper and permanent healing and life changes than traditional modalities. Human Cosmology™ allows an individual or group to access their own wisdom to move beyond their psychological and belief patterning, physical/emotional/mental limitations. This modality is life changing for anyone who has experienced stress, loss, anxiety, depression, insecurity, PTSD, ADHD abuse of any kind, struggles with communication or relationship issues. This process is superior for creating "real" teamwork environments in the work place, and creating healthy intimate relationships. How The Dots Joined Up For Michael Now of course with Join Up Dots we create content that no only speaks to the entrepreneur, but also the wannabe's. Those people who sit in a cubicle and are yearning to start their own business. So how do you start building a business that isn't just built on flippant throwaway concepts, but stuff that is rooted in scientific fact. And how has he managed to build a flourishing business when he has a large family, no doubt pulling him in so many different directions too. Well lets find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots, with the one and only Michael Cavallaro Show Highlights During the show we discussed such weighty topics with Michael Cavallaro such as: We share how the world has programmed us to operate in a different way from how we might just be operating if we were allowed to think for ourselves. Why being allowed to go for the easy route might just be the perfect thing for all of us to do in our lives, if we just trust. Michael shares the early days of hustling to create his business from scratch, which wasn't easy for sure.  And lastly…….. Why it is so important to squirrel away some nuts in the winter when you are building your business. Make it easier for yourself in the lean times.

Direct download: Michael_Cavallaro_Master.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Introducing Josh Kemp

Josh Kemp is our guest today joining us on the Steve Jobs inspired Join Up Dots podcast.

He  is a man who quite simply has powered his way through many obstacles that would stop most in their tracks.

As he says "I love creating online courses that teach a specific side hustle and how to make money with it in the shortest amount of time possible!

I am the author of No Degree, No Problem.

Originally I was a Blacksmith / Farrier for 8 years but then had to switch careers after getting kicked by a horse.

I self taught myself how to code and landed a Junior Software Development position 9 months later making $ 70K.

I currently live in Raleigh, North Carolina with my wife, three kids, two goats and a gecko.

Now most interestingly for a show called Join Up Dots, which follows loosely the words or the late Steve Jobs, our guest did a similar thing when it came to getting a college qualification.

 

How The Dots Joined Up For Josh

He goes on to say "I remember when I was 16 my Mom had me take Business Law classes at the local community college.

My Mom was big on making sure ALL her kids went to college and got a degree.

After barely failing the first class, I decided college wasn't for me, it wasn't until I was 18 that I broke my parents’ hearts and told them I wouldn't be going to college.

Over the years I have had to switch careers and have had over a dozen different side hustles in my life.

My Mom no longer worries about me becoming destitute, l have used the power of side hustles all my life ( except for a 1 year period ) to provide better for myself and family, as well as learn more about what things are a good fit for me."

So does he feel he is still working towards the big thing that will define his life, or is that not important anymore?

And why do people struggle so much to make a living online, when all the clues are already there to follow the success of others?

Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Josh Kemp

 

Show Highlights

During the show we discussed such deep subjects with Josh Kemp such as:

How culturally we have lost the ability to get down and dirty and work for a living, even if its an online venture. A dream life doesn't come easily.

Josh shares why you should always go where the money is.  Look for who has it and then decide what you can do for them.

Always look for the problem that can be solved for as many people as possible you can then scale scale scale.

And lastly...........

Josh tells us a great story of a snow blower, inspiration and hustle that almost ended his marriage but became amazing motivation.

Direct download: Josh_Kemp.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 2:49pm UTC

Introducing Spikeball Creator Chris Ruder Chris Ruder is the CEO and Founder of Spikeball Inc a new and fun sport that looks like its going to be big everywhere. The Jonas Brothers, Drake, Julianne Hough, Ryan Seacrest, 21 Pilots, Casey Neistat, and numerous pro sport teams and players have expressed their love for Spikeball. Spikeball’s appearance on Shark Tank was voted as one of the best episodes of all time. ESPN went as far as to say Spikeball is mainstream. Now our guest today started the business 2008 and ran it as a night job for 5 years while keeping his day job as an Advertising Executive. 5 years after its founding, Spike ball hit $1 million in annual sales with zero full-time employees. How The Dots Joined Up For Spike Ball At that time, Chris quit his day job and went full-time. That was one of the best days of his life and Spikeball’s mission is to the create the next great global sport, with tournaments appearing on ESPN whilst taking place all over the world. Chris lives in Chicago with his 3 great kids and fantastic wife. He is on the board of I Grow Chicago and the company has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to help address gun violence, the environment and education.  So did he need to spend those five years as a side hustle business, or was it simply a leap into the unknown that scared him. And how do you know that you have a great product on your hands before you ever invest your own money into the business? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Chris Ruder Show Highlights During the show we discussed such deep subjects with Chris Ruder such as: Chris shares how Spikeball wasn't his idea at first, but he took an original product that in many ways had failed and made it much better. Why it is such an amazing idea to provide free parts for life to customers as they become your marketing department for free. Chris allows us a glimpse into the starting process of getting his customers to fall in love with SpikeBall. And lastly........... The Spikeball founder talks openly about his appearance on Dragons Den, and what the show truly brings a new business.

Direct download: Spikeball_Founder.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Todays guest on the Join Up Dots business coaching podcast is Andrew Phelps. He is the Creative Director of User10, a boutique studio focused on SaaS product strategy and design. He leads design teams at small startups as well as enterprise brands. An expert in product strategy and design, he was named one of the Arizona Republic's 35 under 35. He shares his knowledge of strategy, design, and entrepreneurship at ASU, SEEDSPOT, and The CleanTech Open. But the main reason that i wanted him to be on the show today was this piece of wisdom, taken from his website. "We believe that design and technology should serve humanity and that anything worth doing is worth doing beautifully. Challenges can be big and complex, but the best solutions are elegantly simple. How The Dots Joined Up For Andrew The best part is the process is no secret. Building high quality applications and websites is as much about great communication as it is about good design and code. Isn't that what I say on Join Up Dots all the time? The first stage of business is to find something that people want, then let them see it, and open up communication to chat. So did he fall into the traps of making things more complex than they should be - but extremely pleasing on the eye? And of course when people dont know who there customers are, how do they know how to speak to them directly? Well lets find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots, with the one and only Andrew Phelps Show Highlights During the show we discussed such weighty topics with Andrew Phelps such as: How Apple might have just fallen from the wayside of the magic years driven through the  Andrew shares the steps that he took to where he is today....and it certainly wasn't where he thought he would end up. Andrew remembers meeting his first mentor and being amazed that a fifty year old was so happy with what he was doing. And lastly…….. Why it's so important to start saying NO in a business, so that you can service a smaller and more

Direct download: Andrew_Phelps.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 7:03am UTC

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