Join Up Dots Podcast

Welcome to the Join Up Dots Podcast talking about branding  subscribe to the podcast, please use the links below: Click Here to Subscribe via iTunes Click Here to Subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed) If you like the show, we would be so grateful if would consider leaving the show a review in iTunes as well as Stitcher Radio.  A couple minutes of your time can help the show immensely!  Thank YOU! Welcome to today's episode of the Join Up Dots podcast which will be answering a few questions from our listeners. We love receiving these from people across the world as hey it makes us realise that people are listening to the show. Let's start with Question One that has come from Scotland. In this question we are asked why Join Up Dots has changed slightly over the last few years, and the reasons for it. Also as you will see from the heading of this podcast we touch on what makes branding.   Question One Hi David and everyone connected with the mercurial Join Up Dots podcast, I am a 22 year old gent, from Carnoustie in Scotland. I love your podcast, as honestly I never know what episode I am going to get into each time. Couple of questions if you could.  I started listening a couple of years ago, and your interviews where a lot more cheeky and sarcastic. I loved them massively. The more recent ones, have definitely changed in content style. Was this on purpose as I am interested why the change. Secondly, I hear people talk about branding of a business, and I dont really understand what it is. I think I do, but would like to know your view on this. Keep on delivering as I dont know what I would do to pass the time in my boring boring boring, mind controlling, energy sapping job. Cheers Charlie Question Two Good morning David, where have you been all my life. I listened to a show recently when you said "You don't really do anything online in regards to social media" I have always thought that this was a huge part of growing a business. Why dont you do it too? Evelyn Crowel, Oswego, New York Question Three Hi David, I dont know if you will get to read this so i will do the normal and say "Man you are one sexy and handsome individual for sure" I have been working on an online business over the last few years selling blankets and jackets for terriers across the world. It was a passion project for sure, but now its a business I am losing my passion for it. When an order comes in I used to think "Hurrah, my future is assured" and now I am thinking "Just let the dog freeze" not good. Any suggestions to get the passion back Hannah, North Dakota

Direct download: Whats_This_Branding_Stuff_About_.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Introducing Ariel Garten Today's guest joining us on the Join Up Dots business coaching podcast is Ariel Garten. without a doubt this lady is probably one of the most interesting people you will meet. She is a psychotherapist, Neuroscientist, mom, former fashion designer, and the female founder and visionary of an amazing and highly successful tech start-up Muse. Now if you have heard of muse then get this. Muse tracks your brain during meditation to give you real-time feedback on your meditation, guiding you into the “zone” and solving the problem most of us have when starting a meditation practice. Muse lets you know when you are doing it right. How The Dots Joined Up For Ariel When Ariel is not reading brains (literally) or investing in, inspiring and advising other start-ups and women in biz, you can find her on stages across the world, from TED to MIT to SXSW. She inspires people to understand that they can accomplish anything they want by learning what goes on in their own mind. As she says "My MISSION is multi-fold: To support women to be kick ass in business, to mentor start-ups, and to contribute to the cutting edge of neuroscience.  My desire is to help you do a deep dive in understanding your brain, how it makes you who you are, and how to help you manage the crazy that resides in all our minds." So how did something which seems so complex go from the thought, to the vision, to the reality? And where can she see this technology heading going forwards? Well lets find out as when bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Ariel Garten. Show Highlights  During the show we discussed such weighty subjects with Ariel Garten such as: We talk about the initial factors of finding the cash and struggling when starting your own business what is the point of being the richest person on the planet, if you can't then help others. We discuss how Ariel used to be poor at meditation and found this as he springboard for what has become MUSE And lastly.......... Why the majority of people are unhappy due to their inability to centre themselves in the present moment.

Direct download: Ariel_Garten.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Introducing Steve Farber Today's guest joining us on the Join Up Dots business coaching podcast interview is Steve Farber He is the president of Extreme Leadership, Incorporated, and the founder of The Extreme Leadership Institute, organizations devoted to the cultivation and development of Extreme Leaders in the business community, non-profits and education. His third book, Greater Than Yourself: The Ultimate Lesson In Leadership, was a Wall Street Journal® and USA Today® bestseller. His second book, The Radical Edge: Stoke Your Business, Amp Your Life, and Change the World, was hailed as “a playbook for harnessing the power of the human spirit.”  And his first book, The Radical Leap: A Personal Lesson in Extreme Leadership, is already considered a classic in the leadership field. It received Fast Company magazine’s Readers’ Choice Award and was recently named one of the 100 Best Business Books of All Time. Farber's much-anticipated new book, Love Is Just Damn Good Business, will be published by McGraw-Hill on September 6, 2019. How The Dots Joined Up For Steve In 1989, after having run his own financial services company, Farber devoted his professional life to the field of leadership development and has been at it ever since. He was director of service programs at TMI, an international training consultancy, and then worked for 6 years as Vice President and Official Mouthpiece (that’s what it said on his business card) of The Tom Peters Company where he met several of his mentors including author/gurus Tom Peters, Jim Kouzes, and Terry Pearce. In 2000, Farber established his own company, Extreme Leadership, Inc, where he is president and CEO. He is a member of The Transformational Leadership Council and has served as Vice Chairman on the Board of Directors of the world-renown, Up With People, a global leadership program for students from 18 to 29 years old. Coaching and inspiring Extreme Leadership at all organizational levels is Steve’s passion, and he does so with a style that is part strategist, part social commentator and all energy. So is this one of those jobs that energises him to jump out of bed every day, inspired to make a difference to the world? And how do you get these kind of things going, when its just a thought new to the mind, and never before seen in the world? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start join up dots with the one and only Mr. Steve Farber Show Highlights During the show we discussed such weighty subjects with Steve Farber such as: Steve shares how he got the name of Extreme Leadership, and why it is so important to his success. Why we should start with the big question "What can I do to start building something" and then make a difference to others. How we have to all get into habits of finding the passion in our lives to really kick start the life we want. And lastly........ Steve says "It's not his job to convince someone to do something, it's his job to confirm the talent you already have" Profound advice.

Direct download: Steve_Farber.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Today's guest joining us on the Join Up Dots business coaching podcast is a man with knowledge to burn. He can talk passionately about how he created huge success in the entrepreneurial world. Actually bootstrapping a business to the tune of $20,000,000, as well as building a multi-million dollar property portfolio business. But he has also seen it all come crumbling down around him too. Starting his first venture at age 17,  he has travelled extensively and lived in more than five countries as a young man. This blend of travel and business means that Derek Gallimore is very familiar with a wide variety of business models, work cultures and methodologies. Heard the phrases digital nomad, online traveller....well he was all of these before anyone knew what to call them. Now, due in no short measures to his travels he has been firmly obsessed by the world of outsourcing and virtual teams. How The Dots Joined Up For Derek He was introduced to outsourcing in 2011 when he needed a solution to a 24/7 staffing requirement, and simply could not afford the high labour costs of the 'West'. He is now one of the industry's biggest advocates and so founded Outsource Accelerator in response to the growing need for an independent source of outsourcing information and education. Outsourcing (otherwise known as offshoring or BPO), is a booming industry. The 'West' is outsourcing many of its roles to the developing countries of the world. This is happening at an increasing rate as technology facilitates faster transfer, with better interface across a broad range of applications. As he says "There is an unstoppable trend of this, as naturally, higher cost functions will seek out lower cost alternatives. This is a natural business imperative. Outsourcing is a positive phenomenon. It greatly benefits the developing countries that it utilises, and it is a huge economic boon for the developed countries that seek cheaper resource." So how do you make this work for your business, without having to micro manage the work you needed done in the first place? And i guess most importantly how do you find the good workers, when you are so detached from ever personally meeting? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start join up dots with the one and only Derek Gallimore. Show Highlights During the show we discussed such subjects with Derek Gallimore such as: Why you should consider the friction points that that can cause an issue when you first outsource abroad. Dont think they wont come. Derek discusses openly the reasons why you have to spend time getting your staff up to speed before you expect to get results. Derek shares the fear of why being ordinary was more scary than going the common path that everybody else goes as a young man. and lastly...... Why you are not going to pull yourself out of the gravitational pull of others without some extreme effort at the beginning of business building.

Direct download: Derek_Gallimore.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Todays guest joining us on the Join Up Dots free podcast interview is a lady who is a complete rockstar. Not in the get up on stage and grind it like Tina Turner type of rockstar or perhaps she does that in her spare-time. But the kind of rockstar that can make your marketing, jump out of the page, like Mick Jagger on speed. As she says “I can take you from “I don’t know” or “This doesn’t work” or even “I’m not having any FUN with this!” to “My Marketing ROCKS!” Which is of course a very confident statement to make, and one that works on every level. So who is she? She is the former Marketing Manager for Glazer-Kennedy Insider’s Circle – whose first sales-letter generated nearly $9,000.00 in less than 3 days to a list barely over 200 people. My copy and marketing strategy contributed to a campaign that generated over $1 MILLION at an international event attended by more than 1,000 people. As she says “When I began working for Dan Kennedy and Bill Glazer in 2007, a whole new world was opened up to me in terms of marketing. I’d always paid attention to advertising, and I always had a strange addiction to infomercials, but I never could have imagined that my life would begin revolving around all things marketing, all the time. I studied Psychology, English and Creative Writing in college – never once suspecting that perhaps I was setting myself up for a career in marketing. I always just loved the English language and the way words could be used to accomplish so many things… and in my Psychology classes, I was learning what made people tick. Now I have the great pleasure of taking the things that I love and doing them for money! I get to figure out new ways to make people buy things and it’s quite rewarding to know that my words helped someone increase their bottom line and benefit their bank accounts. I really do have the best job in the world.” So what is the difference between creative writing, and great marketing copy? And does she see that this was something she learnt, or was always in here in some degree? Well lets find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Alyson Lex.

Direct download: Alyson-Lex.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Les Brown And The Bamboo Tree Intro 0:00 When we're young, we have an amazing positive outlook about how great life is going to be. But somewhere along the line we forget to dream and end up settling. Join Up Dots features amazing people who refuse to give up and chose to go after their dreams. This is your blueprint for greatness. So here's your host live from the back of his garden in the UK, David Ralph. David Ralph 0:22 Yes, hello, Good morning, here. Good morning. And welcome to a Join Up Dots. This is a solo show, it's a solo show, it's just gonna be me, just gonna be me. But I've got things to say I want to, I want to talk to you guys, I want to talk to you about something that I get asked so many times, not by email, not by sort of listeners, but more often when I'm sitting with someone, and we go out for meal me and the wife. And me and my wife and my wife has this annoying habit. And she starts talking to the table next year. And it's all right, when they say sort of have a little chat, and then they disappear. But sometimes the people next to us kind of go, Oh, you don't mind if we join you and I joined another good. Okay. And so I end up talking to a lot of people that I've just gone out to speak to my wife, but just going out to have a lovely time. So juicing the old Why buy a bag of chips and a subway? I don't do any more than that, you know, is she worth it? After 400 years? Of course she is. But she likes a big subway. If you don't know why subway is across the world. It's like a big, ugly looking hot dog is kind of red. God knows what's in it probably the worst of humanity. And it has like little hard bits at the end, which it sounds disgusting. And you don't cook them, you just like lay him in boiling water. And I just thought simmer for a million years. But I love a subway, and my wife hates one. And they look they know, I'm not going to say that I actually censored myself here just for a second, it doesn't happen very often.  I've got this image in my head about Labradors. And kind of Let it out, let it out of the bag. But still, anyway. So we were sitting there the other night, and this family sort of sat next to us and the guy was talking about his job up in the city and stuff. And he made that fatal mistake of saying, I'd love to leave my job. I don't know what to do. And I'll keep my mouth shut, David, keep your mouth shut. And my wife didn't keep my mouth shut. And she said, Oh, we can help you with that. He's got his own business. And so the guy said, Oh, what do you do? And I said, How are you? I'm a podcaster of a podcaster? Oh, okay, um, can I hear you anywhere? Which is what I get that a lot. And what would be the point of being a podcaster? If I go? No, actually, you can't. You can't tune in. You can't. But they always say" Can I hear you anywhere?" No point would there be no point? And I said, Oh, yeah, you can get me everywhere you can get me on iTunes, you can get me on Stitcher, you can get me on tune in radio, you can get me on Amazon dot you can get me any way you want. But you use special man have got me here. And so he said to me, you know, what I'd like to do is I'm starting my own business. But I don't really know what to do. So I sat with him for a little bit. And we were sort of chatting about different things. And he was, it was a pleasant God. And Benny said to me the thing, which is what this episode is all about what this episode is all about. He said to me, you know, but how long do you think it will take? And I always want to say to these people, how the bloody hell would I know, you know, you can have the best idea in the world and sit there with your hands in your pants watching TV for six months, or you can get out there and you can hustle. And you can make it work in just a few weeks. And quite a few other guys that I've worked with paid on like mental balls. And now you've gotten their business up and running in just a few weeks a lot better than I did. But I suppose in the back of the, in the back of my mind in the in the old days, I wasn't really sure what I was doing. I was just kind of becoming a radio host. And I couldn't see how to make money. So it took me quite a long time to actually turn it into something profitable. But these guys have really done it in a short period of time. And I said to him, I said to him, Look, there's a storey there's a parable. And he said, Tell me, and I said you really want to know I said, because this isn't what you want to know. But it's what you need to know. I said, Have you ever heard about the Chinese bamboo tree? And he said, No, what space and I said, Look, there's this bamboo tree in in China, and you get them around the world. And it grows 90 feet in five years, which seems quite a lot. It seems brilliant. But the majority of time it doesn't do anything. It's just underground. And every day, you've got to come out and you've got to water this lump of ground and not see anything happen. But five years, every single day, 365 days a year, water on a bit of mud and next year, 365 days, water on a bit of money, you get the idea. And then you might ask your friends, I mean, you want to go off on vacation, but you say I need to water the mud, I need to stay here on water my mud and people will say I'll just leave it you know, if I leave it. If I leave it. It's never going to happen. I've got to keep on watering the mud, I've got to do it every single day. It won't make any difference. You could you could just leave a couple of days. I'll do it. I'll do it and the neighbour will say are come around and watermark. But you think No you won't. You barely feed me cat, let alone water the mud, I've got to do it myself. So every single day you go out and do it now. In the fifth year, suddenly it starts to sprout. And within the next six weeks, it grows 90 feet. It grows 90 feet. Now, the question is, as we will here in a moment, because I'm going to play a speech by Les Brown who talks about the same thing? Is it growing 90 feet in six weeks? Or is it growing 90 feet, five years, everything you do building into your business and building into your lifestyle. A lot of times you don't see the rewards, and you just sort of doing anything. It's not going anywhere. It's not going anywhere. But of course, you're watering your mud every single day you're watering your mud. And then little by little you go oh my god is I've actually getting a business here. I'm getting a business and people want me and people, people love me. And you can also with emotional and then us kind of gain clarity. And then it becomes easy becomes easier after that. But certainly with Join Up Dots, or, you know, many years, it was just watering mud every single day, I would come out here and like water it and then I'd record episodes and I put them out to the world. And I didn't know whether people were listening or not. Yeah, the audience speakers were going up, I wasn't getting any sort of communication from people. But I just kept on doing it. I just kept on doing it. And now it's shooting up, you know, it's shooting up like a like a movie stuffed tabloid every single day, every single day. It goes a little bit higher when it has some dips, but I'm happy with the progress you see. And we're talking about on another episode, but depths of business where you think it's only got to go one way. And when the dips come up, oh god, it's going wrong. It's going well, no, it's just being what it should be at that period of time. So let's listen to Les Brown. And he is a motivational speaker in America. And let's see what he says about the bamboo tree. And then of course, I'll see you at the other end. Ill see you in a minute, Les Brown 0:22 that is not going to happen as quickly as you want it to happen, a lot of things gonna happen that will catch you off guard. And so therefore you've got to deal with and handle it as it comes. And not only that, but that faith and patience drives you into action. You got to keep moving and keep plugging away. And the Far East have something that's called the Chinese bamboo tree. The Chinese bamboo tree takes five years to grow. And when they go through a process of growing it, they have to water and fertilise the ground where it is every day. And it doesn't break through the ground until the fifth year. Okay, but once it breaks through the ground, within five weeks, it grows 90 feet tall. Now the question is does it grow 90 feet tall? In five weeks? or five years? The answer is obvious. It grows 90 feet tall in five years, because at any time had that person stop watering and nurturing and idolising that dream that bamboo tree would have died in the ground. And I can see people coming out talking to a god. They're watering and fertilising the ground. That's not showing anything. Hey, what you doing? A long time, man. And the conversation in the neighbourhood is you growing a Chinese bamboo tree? Yeah, that's right. Well, even rates thousand feet of water. How long you been working on this? How long? Have you been working on your dream? And you have nothing to show. This is all you got to show. People don't do that to you. And some people, ladies and gentlemen, they stop. Because they don't see instant results. It doesn't happen quickly. They stop Oh, no, no, no, no, you gotta keep on watering your dream. When it began to happen, they stopped laughing they said, Look, whoa, look, it's bad. You know, you can do it look good. You got a job here. David Ralph 10:16 So if you ever meet me in a pub or a bar, we stop talking about these things. What is the question you should never ask? I'll give you a moment. There you go. didn't give you too long. But you should never ask how long is it going to take? Because you can't answer that. I could say it's going to take five years, it's going to take five minutes, you could hit a home run instantly. Who knows. But the one thing that you've got to do every single day without doubt, is water, that mud, you've got to go out and you've got to do something because all those little things that seem never to be connected, actually building the foundations of what you want to achieve. Every single episode of Join Up Dots has got a storey of nothing happening, just floating around just doing this doing that doing a dead end job. But all the experience builds up into something and then you can grow 90 feet in six weeks, you become the bamboo tree. So don't get dispirited, don't build down. Don't look at your own business and go it's not getting anywhere. Because I promise you is as long as you keep on doing it. Thank you so much for listening. Um, anybody who wants me and wants my help in any regard, drop me a line. Always happy to to chat with people who really want it and really are committed. And next time I will see you again. I don't know what episode you're going to get. But I'll tell you well, yeah, yeah, I got one. Look after yourselves. And I'll see you again soon. Cheers. Bye bye.

Direct download: Les_Brown_And_The_Bamboo_Tree.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Introducing Bernadette Doyle

Today's guest joining us on the Join Up Dots business coaching podcast is a lady with a fascinating story. Her entrepreneurial journey began at the age of 26 where she was successfully trading her time for money and found herself overwhelmed and constantly hustling despite how successful she was. After the birth of her first son, Bernadette found that her own success had become an anchor. As the demands on her time grew, suddenly she needed a team and to house and manage that team. Her previous business model was simply unsustainable. Soon after, Bernadette fully switched to an online model and soon found herself freed of her constraints. By packaging her expertise into products and online programs and connecting with customers by teleconference and webinar, she doubled her income in her first year as a new mother, all with time to spend with her family. By 2008, Bernadette had generated a million dollars in online sales and even masterminded personally with Richard Branson, all with the free time to be a single mother to her two children. How The Dots Joined Up For Bernadette As she says "What makes me unique is that I have built my own home-based business to the million dollar level not just once, but twice! The first time I did it by working hard, getting busier and frankly doing a lot of stuff I didn’t really want to do, but thought I had to do to be successful. Then I got a huge wake up call when my son nearly died that caused me to re-evaluate everything. The second time I did it, I did it with a much simpler business model that works around my family and allows me plenty of time off. Even though I no longer lead business events outside of my home town, I am still able to connect with and serve clients all over the world. So is she now living her dream-life or does she feel she is just tapping into what is possible? Well let's find out by joining up those dots, with the one and only Bernadette Doyle Show Highlights During the show we discussed such weighty subjects with Bernadette Doyle such as: Bernadette remembers how she first saw the informational products selling online and knew her future was going to be very different indeed. Why it so important to screen clients and not let everyone into your products and programme. Be selective and find the gold Bernadette shares her assessment of the "non-energies" tasks she performs everyday, and why it so important to keep your energy levels up. We talk about how just one day away disconnected from everything can bring back an eight hour recharge to your life, And lastly...... Why clarity in business should always be the key thing to aim for......keep on asking yourself "does this make sense to the client?" 

Direct download: Bernadette_Doyle.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Intro 0:00 When we're young, we have an amazing positive outlook about how great life is going to be. But somewhere along the line we forget to dream and end up settling. Join Up Dots features amazing people who refuse to give up and chose to go after their dreams. This is your blueprint for greatness. So here's your host live from the back of his garden in the UK. David Ralph. David Ralph 0:25 Yes. Good morning. Good morning to everybody. Everyone across the world. Thank you so much for being here with me. Can we have a group hug, which is WeChat a little arms round and squeezing, squeezing, squeezing? You know, I I've gotten apologies to me, I have gotten an apology to make I recorded a show the other day, called opportunities are everywhere. When we reference Lucas Gordon photography, and I listened back to it this morning, I just dipped into one of my episodes. And that was the one I chose was so fast, I was a little a little little over enthusiastic. I don't know what was the matter with me. So if you listen to that, and thought, My God, you must be on drugs or something. I agree with you. I agree with you. I don't know why I was going at it so fast. It didn't feel like it at a time maybe. Maybe I was just excited. Maybe I was just an excitable man. And, and it came out in my voice. So I do apologise, I do apologise, I'll try to get back on to normal track because I do know, I get a lot of people across the board across the board across the world from abroad, listening to Join Up Dots. And some of them say, I don't catch all what you talk about. But I enjoy the passion. Well, I don't think that one you would have called or enjoyed the passion at all. So I do apologise, I do apologise. I'm going to take it slow. I'm going to take it slow. Why Today's episode is from a listener. And I hope you like these little little listens as well. It's not just interviews, we're trying to, we're trying to change it around, we're trying to put a little bit of element of what you want into it. So some people might only have a little bit of time. Going for a little 14 minute Join Up Dots. Others I've got hours and hours when go for that one, trying to blend it. It's all about you guys. Anyway, this is an email that came through from Marcus archers from New Zealand. And Marcus says dear David, David, I listened to your show sporadically. And I've always been partial to listen to it more. I think this is brilliant. This sounds like a native, doesn't it? Yeah. Can't be balanced. I don't know why I go off elsewhere. But I guess I'm easily distracted. One of the things that you can talk about is making time to be disconnected from your business and the world. And I struggle with this majorly. And I would like to become better. Over best. Right? I think I tell you what I tell you. I was there. I was wondering the field batting of sheep left right in the centre there. I was going to be in the new new Lord of the Rings field. That's how good at my accent was where? Why did David? Because I think Australians do that sort of everything's a question at the end of the day, David, I listened to your show, sporadically. And always think I should listen to it more. You having sounding good. It's all that I know what it means something that when your voice goes up at the end, like a question, but it's not a question. But it's a question. That's what the LC is a monster. Okay, yeah. being distracted and disconnected from the world. And it is a big, big problem. And I think it's it's the major problem. I know, my kids struggle with it. My I think everyone struggles with it. And I, I'm very good at disconnecting. But I also having an online business, I feel that poor, I feel that poor like, everyone really, you know, the world has never been more connected. And no matter where in the world you are, you can send a message to anyone in another part of the world, as long as you both have internet connexion. I'm a member in the sort of 80s in the 70s. Anyone from the United Kingdom will remember this, you'd go on holiday to Spain, and you'd have to wait a week for the newspapers to turn up. And so he was always a week behind the football results. He was always a week and one person would get the paper and you share it around with anybody else. It was like it was it was like a drug deal. But you go How can I have 10 minutes? In an hour? Can I have 10 minutes I newspaper done? I want I've gone back into that accident. I just like doing it. I really do. And yeah, but now you just got being and you just never never away from stuff is it's annoying, but it's the way it is. It's the way it is. Right. Also, I think one of the issues is that all these devices out there are designed to make you actually want to get hooked up to them, you can't fight it. They are like psychological experiments being paid on us. So that we will feel that desire. That's what it designed for. And as soon as you realise that Facebook and LinkedIn and Twitter and all the social media platforms are designed by people, I'm getting a lot slower today. And I I feel I feel more in control of everything. And they're in designed by people who are actively trading on our emotions, our stress levels, our need to not miss out on those kind of things. And once you realise that, and you realise that they're playing on a kind of internal algorithm, it's easier to stop. Okay, so some of the things that I actually do, right, I don't look at any games, well, I don't have any gadgets, I have my PC in Join Up Dots, HQ. And I have this morning laptop, which I'm going to get rid of because it started not logging on. And so I spend 1015 minutes trying to get it to work. So I'm actually going to get rid of it. So I'm now down to just my PC. So when I turn that off, I've gone. Absolutely no one on earth will be able to get me. But I've started to limit my amount of time I come to my office. And if I do come to my office, what I used to do is leave my computer on all the time, and I could just come along and boom hours easy to turn on. Now I'm turning it off. So I might come up here to read a book, I might come here to plan something. But actually getting into the online world, I don't unless I actually have to turn my computer on which once again is a little barrier for me to do. But you can certainly eliminate gadgets for one hour before sleep and after wake up. So my daughter will reach out and before our eyes even open in the morning, she's got her phone, and she's reaching and dragging it under the covers. So she's hi asleep, but she knows that she needs a phone. My wife needs a phone by the side of a bed. In case of emergencies. I go, what emergencies Are we going to have? Everybody that you love is basically in our house, or vape got people to support them, you know, you know, Batman woman, you know, getting a suddenly ever dot appear on the ceiling and you've got to go out and solve crime during the night. You don't need to have your phone on all the time. I just turned the notifications up. She doesn't talk about that. And I say no. Is that gonna be all the notifications because my wife's not good. We got a new radio, we got a new alarm by the side of the bed because she decided that the light of the previous one that we've had for a million years was too bright. It was too bright. It is keeping me awake. Well, if you hear the snoring, I don't think it is. But anyway, so we've gone to this other one that you can dim down. And she doesn't like the buzzer, because it sounds like a lowly reversing. You know they do that noise. And it actually gets louder. So you actually feel like you're gonna back to be run over and you sleep. And so you suddenly panic, but a law is just going to crash your head. But when you go, Oh no, it's always the alarm. So she doesn't like that. Now she's going for the radio. And now, the other night, she set the radio to come on at half past 12 in the morning, panicked. And they went out for God's sake, why is it doing this? Probably because you programmed it to do that. And then reset it again for half past two in the morning. So we had the radio burst into our life all the way through the night. But it wasn't, it wasn't the devices fault. It was the wives. I'm telling you that don't say anything, but it was the white spot. So what you need to do is reach out and turn off all your devices before and after wake up and have that set into your your routine. And turn off all your notifications. It doesn't only save battery life, it also saves you from a lot of distractions turn up all your push notifications from email, chat, social media, your application. If it's really really urgent, somebody will knock on your door for example, you know, people won't be drowning. I'm drowning, I'm drowning, I'm drowning. Send a text message to your best mate. That wouldn't happen. You would shout out Help me Help me, you know, urgent doesn't happen. And as we're talking about emergencies, do this as well. Because I get this a lot when people say to me, you really haven't got a phone, you haven't got a phone? Oh, no, I haven't got a phone. What do you do in emergencies? And I always say to him, when was the last time you had an emergency? And I go Oh, no, no, it does happen. I got When was the last time. And I would say to all of you if you're in that light? Yes, there's emergencies all the time. just jot it down and jot it down on a scale of one to 10. When you get something through, was that an emergency did that need it now. And you'll see you rarely ever. If anything I once broke down on the Alps, I was 12,000 feet up in a car with broke down, couldn't get it going. And my dad had an emergency phone, thank God because otherwise I don't know what we would have done that I think in my life is the only emergency I've ever had. Okay, doesn't really happen. Now, if you do need to have all these phones around you keep your phone in the drawer while you're working. Just just lock it away. And just try to think to yourself, now keep it there. And when you get that urge in your stomach, because you do you get a bit tense Do you get a bit twitchy just being said, Well, I'm feeling twitchy. I'm feeling twitchy, I'm going to go for another 10 minutes, don't beat yourself, I'm leaving it in there forever. Because you won't do that. That's like trying to lose 30 stone in a month. Just leave it in there go right now I can do another 10 minutes, I'll do another 10 minutes is now 1106, I'm going to wait to 1116 before I get back and start increasing it little by little 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, because you are trying to break free from an addiction. These devices are created. So you're addicted, it's the way they work. But you can't go cold turkey because it just won't work. Now, one of the things that I don't understand, but one of my mates says he does is he has only one device for checking social media. He can he can get Facebook, on your desktop, on your laptop on your smart phone, even on your Apple Watch. So you're checking everywhere, he now is it all through into one device. Now I've got one and it's called a man's name. I can't think what it is. But I put it in the links. And I haven't used it for a while. That's why I can't remember. But it has LinkedIn it has Facebook on it has all the notifications and I can go on to it. Within one second, I can see and turn it all off. So instead of going into Facebook and going into here and going into a or whatever, or having all the notifications, I don't have any notifications at all, I just have this one device, whatever it's called now coming was called is something to do with Roman is come to me. And I just log on once every three days or something and I have a quick look. And bang, it's done. Okay. Now, then the next thing that I would do, and these are the kinds of things I do, I have a thing called stay focused on Chrome, which I can programme my favourite websites. And we all have websites that were desperate to get into and we're going to check mines BBC Sport, are can go on to BBC Sport and find out where this football players being transferred. And that is not necessary. But I do. So I limited and I give myself 15 minutes a day on this website. And when it closes down, and it won't activate again till the next day. And you can set it up stay focused on Chrome. It's a free app. And it's brilliant. And as I say I look at it and I think to myself running out and running out I've got to do it bang is gone. And that's it. I just have to walk away from it. And so I prepare. And I think to myself, I have I got 15 minutes, yes, I have because what I don't want to do is it sort of waste of time, I want to make the most of it. Once again, your chance to do now somebody else told me what what they do, I have over sort of like the summaries of the websites, come to them in an email. So I can just scan down. I don't know how that's done, if anybody knows how that's done. But that's what he does. email comes through, it gives over sort of highlights of the website changes, and you can scan down and you can just keep up with it. Okay. And the last thing that I would say is go to emails once a day, okay, just just once a day that there's nothing, the problem is in business, people use it to talk, they don't use it to actually confirm, they just use it to communicate. So you're in there all the time sending two line emails back and forth, because you're too lazy to walk across the desk. If that is you then say to your colleagues, no, I'm not going to do this until 12 o'clock lunchtime, and bed, I'm going to open it up anything he wants saved about time, and I will respect or we can talk face to face. Because in the online world, email still remains the most personal way of online communication is it this is where the most important engagements happen, tweets and all those kinds of stuff it is. So bullet points, this is the big stuff. And so social media, like Friendster and multiply, have come and gone, all these kind of things, but email still remains and it always will. So limit yourself. Don't think that it's important. It's not if it is important in your company, your boss will come across. And if he's just sending an email expecting you to respond straight away, then it's not, it's not okay. So that there are kind of things Marcus, but I do. But the main thing that I do is I don't have a phone. I push everything now into messenger, and email. That's the only two ways that you can communicate with me away from that I don't look at anything. And I'm just aware of it. And I'm not a month, I still feel that that pole, that desire to check into these things. But by doing that, and just being aware and try to do 10 minutes and then make it 20 minutes and try to do an hour you will start breaking that addiction. And then you can do a day two weeks, you know, I can do a month at a time not look at anything. I probably could do longer than that now to just the way that I've organised it. So let me know Marcus, if you've managed to do anything and you try to stay disconnected and focus because it's a real game changer. And I will promise to practice my New Zealand accent. I really will. I'm gonna really Tommy best to do that. Until next time. Look out yourselves everybody. Thank you so much for being here and I will see you again soon. Bye bye. Unknown Speaker 15:48 That's the end of China. Unknown Speaker 15:51 You heard the conversation. Now it's time for you to start taking massive action. Unknown Speaker 16:01 QB create your life easy only life. Unknown Speaker 16:07 Will be back again real soon. Join Up Dots Join Up Dots Join Up Dots Unknown Speaker 16:15 Jolly Jolly.

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Introducing Pete Matthew Today's guest joining us on the show is a man who needs no introduction. Not if you are in the world of saving money, investing wisely and making the most of you cash. In fact he was first on the show back a couple of years ago, beaming in from his mansion in Cornwall. He is a Financial Planner, Podcaster, Video Blogger, Social Media Trainer. Managing Director of Jacksons Wealth Management. Best of all can teach us how to take control of our cash in ways that simply are life changing. As he says “I am a Certified Financial Planner and Chartered Financial Planner providing fee-based holistic financial planning advice in Penzance, West Cornwall. I am also an award-winning podcaster, and video blogger. My passion is to spread the word that anyone can take control of their personal finances. I am fulfilling this passion via my financial education website and podcast, Meaningful Money. Through video, podcasting and social media I am reaching thousands of people every week with my simple financial planning message. How The Dots Joined Up For Pete  I set out to provide simple, accessible financial planning information to the masses, and decided that video might be a good way to do this, and through trial and error, built a site full of basic instructional video. Through my work with this site, I was awarded IFALife’s Social Media Financial Adviser of the Year award 2010. I also won the Professional Adviser Financial Education award in both 2011 and 2012. I also received the Scottish Widows award for Industry Innovation in 2014, and was named UK Podcast of the Year in 2015. And now he is bringing all that information into one place, to make it easier than ever to get out of debt and increase their personal wealth with the Meaningful Academy. Split into three parts Financial Foundations being built first, then Building Worth, and Enjoying Your Money coming soon. So are there quick and painless things we can do to get our finances in control? And with the effort it takes to build a platform like he has, does he ever come close to burnout and content indecision? Well let's find out with the one and only money messiah, the financial freedom fighter, the debt destroyer the one and only Pete Matthew. Show Highlights During the show we discussed such weighty subjects with Pete Matthew such as: Why Financial Independence is a choice, and something that should be learnt from a very early age. How the haters can always get through to you, but you have to realise that its a badge of honour for them to contact you. How the damage to our mental health referenced in the book "Digital Minimalism: On Living Better with Less Technology" is something that we have to bring into family life. And lastly...... Pete talks openly about the assistance he gets to make firm decisions to Meaningful Money, which perhaps he wouldn't be able to see otherwise How To Connect With Pete Matthew Website Facebook Linkedin Twitter Return To The Top Of Pete Matthew If you enjoyed this episode with Pete Matthew, why not check out other inspirational chat with Clayton Morris, Dorie Clark, and the amazing Niall Doherty You can also check our extensive podcast archive by clicking here – enjoy Audio Transcription Of The Pete Matthew Interview Intro 0:00 When we're young, we have an amazing positive outlook about how great life is going to be. But somewhere along the line we forget to dream and end up settling. Join Up Dots features amazing people who refuse to give up and chose to go after their dreams. This is your blueprint for greatness. So here's your host live from the back of his garden in the UK, David Ralph. David Ralph 0:24 Yes. Good morning, my young friends. Thank you so much for being here on another episode of Join Up Dots. Yeah, do you need another episode? Of course you do. And today's one is one I actually woke up in a little bit excited because this man is is he's a mentor to me and he should be a mentor to every one of us out there from the UK to America to Bora Bora to anywhere that has money issues. Now he is a guest joining us on the show and we literally he needs no introduction. Not if you're in the world of saving money investing wisely and making the most of your cash. fact he was on the show back a couple of years ago, beaming in from his mansion in Cornwall now. He's a financial planner, a podcast or a video blogger, social media trainer, and managing director of Jackson's wealth management and best of all, he can teach us how to take control of our cash in ways that simplify and are quite simply life changing. As he says I'm a certified financial planner and Chartered Financial Planner providing fee based holistic financial planning advice in Penzance West combo. I'm also I don't like this bit, an award winning podcast. I've never won anything. I've never even won a bloody swimming badge, but he's got an award and he's a video blogger to now his passion is to spread the word that anyone can take control of their personal finances. I'm fulfilling this passion by my Financial Education website and podcast meaningful money through video podcasting and social media and reaching thousands of people every week with my simple financial planning message. I set out to provide simple accessible financial planning information to the masses, and decided that video might be a good way to do this and through trial and error, built a site or a basic instructional video. Now through my work with this site, I was also awarded IFA is a life social media financial advisor of the Year award in 2010. I also wonder professional advisor financial education ward in both 2011 and 2012. And if that's not enough, he also received the Scottish widows award for industry innovation in 2014. And was also named UK podcast of the Year in 2013. Right and now he's bringing all that information into one place and make it easier than ever to get out of debt and increase their personal wealth with the meaningful Academy split into three parts financial foundations being built first, when building worth and enjoying your money coming soon. So quick and painless things we can do to get our finances control. And with the effort it takes to build a platform like yours. Does he ever come close to burn out and content indecision? Well, let's find out with the one and only the money Messiah, the financial freedom fighter, but debt destroyer, the one and only Martin Lewis no I mean, Pete Matthew Pete Matthew 3:23 What an intro. Nobody does intros lucky, my friend. Nobody does intros like you. Great to be here. David. You're David Ralph 3:29 right. It is lovely. It's lovely. And can I ask Pete Matthew, can I ask you you saw my nipples earlier? And I'm worth it looking good for a man of my age. Pete Matthew 3:40 Yeah, I saw him for a brief second because my retinas dissolved. And now they were looking good. My friend for a man, you're, I do David Ralph 3:48 apologise. It's very hot in the United Kingdom at the moment. And as podcasters we can't afford things like air conditioning and fans, we have to just go through the pain barrier to bring it to you don't. Pete Matthew 4:00 Yeah, we showed there. It's boiling in here is all I'm in the shorts and a T shirt very seriously thinking about taking the T shirt off. So it's good job. It's audio only. This is not a mansion, by the way. I'm talking to you from a cupboard. But you know, David Ralph 4:12 Yeah, I know. But I've seen I've seen where you live. I've been I've been going into sort of financial advisors net worth and your your album. Now the thing I remember you being on the show last time, and it is stuck with me. And it's funny, every podcast episode doesn't stay with me. Unless every now and again, something hits home. And for some reason, and I remember you saying that you went to a financial conference. And as she was pulling up, you saw all these financial advisors with their BMW, Mercedes. And you were thinking, well, that's not very good. You're taking a loan out perfect. How are you providing good financial advice? And that was kind of the starting point to it. Oh, do you look back at those days and think, you know, well, things have moved on. And people are really reclaiming their financial control over people still making the same bizarre things by getting out car loans and stuff where quite simply they can't afford it. Pete Matthew 5:07 A lot of people are still doing that, I do think there is a beginning of a ground swell to taking control of finances, just as there has been an increasing sort of focus on taking better care of our health through eating and exercise and things like that. And if you compare it to where we were in, you know, like 1985, or 1990, or something, you know, you see the kids these days coming out of college, and they're all ripped, right? Because all boys are spending time in the gym stuff. And the girls, you know, they're all looking a lot better than I did when I was 1617. And so I think there is a bit removed towards that. And I think that is now beginning to happen with the with the area of financial sense, financial management as well, which I'm very encouraged by a large part of that is due to what's often called the fire movement, financial independence movement, which is massive in the US really starting to ignite over here too. So I'm excited by it's extremely positive, I think for the future. David Ralph 6:06 Because I had a guy on the show recently, choose f5 choose financial independence, and he was a lovely guest. And at the beginning, I said to him, yeah, I'm financially independent. He said, Well, that's brilliant, good on you. And as we started talking, I thought, Oh, I'm not financially independent at all. Because I actually still have to work for a living, I have to do things. Is that something that we should be aware of? But literally, we do have that opportunity to be purely financially independent by buying pieces of land or renting out properties? Or is it all about as we talk about passive income online businesses, training courses and stuff? Pete Matthew 6:44 Well, I think is probably a bit of all sorts, it's certainly more complex than it than it most people might think it would be. I'm actually, as it happens about four hours from now interviewing Brad and Johnson from choose f5. Myself, David Ralph 6:58 how are you connected? That Pete Matthew 7:02 that's because you introduced me to them for which I'm very grateful, sir. So I'm looking forward to that those guys are prime movers over there, along with like, Mr. Money moustache, in that whole area, essentially, financial dependence is really about choice, you work out of choice rather than necessity. So passive income, the whole Smart Passive income, Pat Flynn, all that sort of stuff that I mean, certainly Pat Flynn would never suggest that it isn't still work, you know, even passive income requires some upkeep. Yeah. But really, for me, the definition of financial independence is not having to work because either you have other income streams, or you have sufficient capital from which to draw to sustain your day to day lifestyle. So there's a whole load of nuance to it. And there's a million ways you can provide either that passive income or you can amass the capital that you need. So as ever these things as a detail underneath the headlines right? David Ralph 7:56 Now, I am not a financial guy, I kind of control I've got to two for now, really. But for the wider sense. I wasn't an opportunity monkey picking the day I used to go to work. And then they'd give me the money. I didn't even query that I would sorting out the right tax. It was just what I got and away away. Since I've become entrepreneurial, it's a different ballgame. And you know, I'm always got a spreadsheet where I'm moving 20% here and 20% there, and I'm keeping base and I'm keeping but do you think that literally people should be trained how to manage their money before they go to work? It should be a prime part, because I think Martin lewis is very big on getting kids to understand that they've got the financial control before anybody is making money, do what you want with it. Pete Matthew 8:48 I for sure. And I think the sweet spot for doing that is sort of tertiary education. So after GCSE, you know, with we have to stay in some kind of full time education now whether it's sort of a you know, college vocational stuff or a levels or whatever. And I think there ought to be a mandatory element of basic money management at that point, because even then, you could argue that the banks have already got the got their claws into us. I don't know about you, David. But I was a Gryphon saver, right. So I was a Midland Bank, customer, Dean, I had the blue binder, and all the sort of the action file, it was called all the cool stuff that you wanted to have as a kid. And of course, I still bank with first direct, which is a subsidiary of HSBC, which bought middle and bank so I've been with that bank now for 30 years, because they nabbed me when I was a teenager. And we need to help kids understand that this is a market and they need to shop around, and not just sort of drift into whatever financial arrangements they end up in. But ultimately, managing money isn't difficult. It's it's about understanding a few basics well enough, so that you can avoid the pitfalls, things like, you know, easy day. We need to understand basic day to day money management, we call it budgeting now, word that anybody likes to talk about. But it's really, really important. And it doesn't need to be involved. It doesn't need to be challenging and difficult. It just needs to be put in early enough. So I mean, I have zero financial education from either school, college, all my parents, but I've made sure I've made the difference with my own kids. But of course, a lot of kids don't get that at home. So I would love to see some kind of mandatory, even if it's like one half term focused weekly lessons that every 16 to 18 year old goes through. I just think that would potentially transform the country Transform, transform the economy, because it would reduce our dependence on debt, and just put us in better financial shape as as a country. David Ralph 10:46 Now I remember back in the day, my first bank was not West and I actually worked for NatWest birth for 10 years, and fixed Well, it was the pigs Yeah, it was Woody, Annabel Maxwell, Lady Hillary and send the fan your Yeah, they came up. David of pigs. And I think woody was the hard one to get. He was the one with the bow tie at the end. But it used to encourage kids to save to get this set. But as soon as I left my employment with NatWest, I said, why I'm leaving much thank you my bank account. I don't want people to know how much I'm earning. Of course, I didn't care anyway. And so I think I've been with every single bank. And one of the things that I reference him again, because he is very prevalent in the United Kingdom. But Martin Lewis, who was the financial guy over here, always says, ditch and switch, you know, move around. I'm interested why you've stayed for 30 years with the same bank then? Pete Matthew 11:37 Because they've Well, they served me very well, for the most part up until about three or four years ago, I had basically everything with them. I do have, you know, my mortgage is now with centre there now. And you know, but prior to that my mortgage, so first, all right. And the reason I ditched them in the end was exactly what you're talking about. They have no loyalty to me, ultimately. Because I rang them because we were moving house, and I needed to borrow less money than I already had on my mortgage over a shorter term, right. So less risk, one would argue for first year at the bank, I spent a half an hour on the phone with them. And I think I needed to borrow some, like 200 grand. And at the end of the thing, this girl said, Well, I'm pleased to tell you, Mr. Matthew, that we're prepared to lend you 115 or something. And I'm like, What? So is that on top of what I already said, No, no, that's the total. So I said, that's the less than I need, despite the fact that you know, I've been born or borrow with you for years. And you can see what I earn. It's plenty, you know, and but the reason this they gave for it was, well, you have all these existing commitments, I said, they are savings and insurance, right. So I'm increasing my, you know, my wealth, my net worth, and my security by paying those monthly commitments is, but they're a commitment, like, No, I'm not. I've just turned them off. No, no, no, no, that didn't work like that. Then it was just a classic computer says no moment. And so that annoyed me. So I went to see a broker, which I should have done way before that and got much better deal in half the time for Santander, I think. So. You know, inertia is always the main reason. For me, a bank is just a commodity, I just don't care about it. As long as it does what I need to do, it's fine. I don't have any issues with what they know about me. I just figured that's that's the way it is. But when it comes to investments and stuff like that, then I'm far more likely to shop around because then it comes down to charges and things like that. David Ralph 13:29 So let's take it into the reason why we've got you on here. Because if you've been over to Pete Matthew site over the last few years, and you can sort of track it back. And I like to do that being a Do you ever use wayback machine? Yes, Gary in it. It's scary. Yes. And I was I was teaching somebody the other day how to build a business. And he was saying, Yeah, but my website looks a bit crap. I say you think you're as good as crap ever look at this. And I was showing him the very first evidence of Join Up Dots. Now I like to go back and I was looking at yours and yours was as it any of them. Now you've had a new one bill. It's really sexy. And what I like about it, and this is why I want people to jump over to your site is there's a sensible hierarchy of information. And there's so much information in there. But it's easy to find. Was that difficult to get set up? Were you sort of looking at it thinking, Oh, my God, I've got so much here six years, seven years of material, how to be sensible for people. Pete Matthew 14:27 Yeah, nearly 20 years. Well, I did it I did an exercise about three years ago. So up until this last iteration, I've always done my website myself, I'm a bit of a nerd. I like to mess around with software and tools and things like that. And I just built it with WordPress picked a theme spent time tweaking it relaunched occasionally. But when I did that, three years ago, I went through every single piece of content, there's now over 750 posts on the website, went through every single one and re categorise them. And I re categorise them into one of four categories. I've now I've seen split them just into three, which are getting started building wealth and enjoying your money, really the main three life stages, financial life stages, if you like. So having done that work, believe me, my web designer, this time that goes at Jeremy digital, they were very grateful that I done that because it made life a lot easier for them to build what we call the Learning Centre. And so it's front and centre there at the top in the in the menu, you can either go straight to podcast, video or articles, but then you go straight, go straight into the Learning Centre, the search thing works like lightning, but you can easily go to whatever your life stages and there's some sort of initial places to start if you're in that live stage. So I kind of did the heartbreak three years ago, but I'm not continually building on it. But if those three main life stages are the core of what I do, people should be able to find what they need fairly quickly. David Ralph 15:49 Well, they do. And I think it's one of the nicest sites I've seen. And I'm not just saying that because you're here. But it's, it's friendly money. And certainly lot of the financial organisations out there, I would say it's boring money, I look at it, and I can't be bothered, just shoot me, you know, but I go over there. And it's like, it's like uncle P is smiling at me. He just seems friendly. There's a picture of him sitting in the betting shop. He's making the next on there, and everything he's happy in his world. Pete Matthew 16:23 Yeah, well, I've got to give credit to to Martin and Lindsey at Jeremy digital, they hope you don't mind me giving them some No, you go for it. They they are experts, I think in building sites with calls to action, where it's really clear what you would want a site visitor to do. And that's either to In my case, I either want them to help themselves, right. That's the whole point. I mean, for money to equip people to make decisions. I frequently say the most people don't need to see a financial advisor until they are in the run into retirement, everybody can benefit from seeing an advisor. But not you don't need to really, if it's about building wealth, there's just a few things you need to do consistently. But when you get to that transitional point into financial independence, there is a whole load of choices facing you there. And it's an unbelievably complex world, a professional advisor can help you there. So I wanted to give people the information they needed to be able to do it themselves, or to get in touch with me to work with my regulated financial planning practice, which as you kind of said earlier on is Jackson's wealth management. meaningful monies become this beast, it started very much as a hobby, a little bit of a gift to the world. I just love messing around with video cameras and editing software and stuff. And it's become an incredible marketing engine. Turns out I was doing something called content marketing week before that phrase was even coined it. And so it's been a real journey. I I feel supremely blessed and bemused by old, but really, it comes down to consistency. Just I mean, you wrote the book on this there. And you know, it's just doing it week after week, after week, day after day after day. And you know, the better. It's come in, both to me, professionally and personally. And financially, of course, but, you know, I get emails every day from people telling me how they've changed their own financial situation. And that's ultimately why I do it. David Ralph 18:11 Well, you will get an email from me because I'm going to say this to you. But I've never said this to you personally. And we talked quite a lot. But I actually, I'm very competitive against you, I look at you, and I look you in the charts. And I think, right, okay, I've got to get higher than him, okay, I use you as the benchmark of what can be done. Because what I love about you, and so many people come across to me, and they will hear me say this. And I say, David, David, you do a podcast? Should I do a podcast? And more often than not, I say, No, don't do a podcast, unless you've got a business. If you've got a business, Ben put a podcast on it. Because it's great way for keeping people on your website longer. Building your personal brand, building the loyalty. Now, where I struggled at the beginning was mine was a podcast. And so I had to kind of grow the audience and Ben growth percent of it so that it started to become a sort of money making machine. And it literally killed me. Now with yourself. You're juggling two things. You This is you but you've also you know, like Batman and Bruce Wayne, you got you got two identities? Which one is taking control? Which one is actually the more the one that you want to be known as? Is it Batman or Bruce Wayne? Pete Matthew 19:27 We're going to assign let's do, let's say Batman has meaning for money, right? Well, that's definitely you mean for money as well as partners to do I'm convinced to that. But I love my day job. I'm very fortunate that I am in business with my due to best mates in the world. So we have a blast working together. We challenge each other. And it's great. So I'm very aware how lucky I am from that school. And I love seeing clients, right, we've got clients that we look after three or four generations of a family. And we Jackson's been around since 1974. So you know, we've got very long relationships, I don't want to just say, you know, Thanks for the memories and go off into the sunset and do me for money, permanently full time. So I am working to get Jackson's to the place where in the not too distant future. I am literally just seeing clients for maybe a day and a half a week and the rest of my time is spot on to meaningful money. Now I am Fridays where we're talking right now we're talking on Friday is meaningful money day for me. So I shut the door, turn the phone off, don't answer Jackson's emails, the staff Don't disturb me all sorts shoot them. And I just record I write, create stuff. And it's been a godsend. And actually, it's my colleague chairs, my co director who became aware that I my focus wasn't really on point, I was neither here nor there. Yeah, I'd be so distracted with me for money stuff while I needed and getting behind on Jackson stuff and vice versa. So he said a lot for God's sake, just do a day a week a demarcate the lines. So my job now is to try and, you know, make the balance between the two a little bit more balance. So this three days Jackson's to dating for money, and then maybe the reverse. So David Ralph 21:00 how do you come up with your your content, because we've Join Up Dots quite? It sounds like I'm making it up as I go along. And quite frankly, I do. I wrote up here, I have one line of an idea. And I turn on the microphone, I start talking and he just comes out to me. And then 30 minutes later I edit it and he's done boom on there. But I still had that. What should I talk about? What should I talk about today, you know, you are actually having to research and make it sensible, because you know, it's not just being flippant and throw away and hope inspiring and motivating your match. You know, you're an adult Pete Matthew, as I say, I'm poopy, you gotta trust uncle Pete Matthew, Pete Matthew 21:40 I got to be careful as well, because I'm in a regulated world. So I could potentially get in trouble. If I say the wrong thing. Now, it's not difficult to stay the right side of those lines, if you know where the lines are. But I do have to be careful. And I'm in all of the fact that you can have basically a one line idea and then achieve what you achieve consistent suddenly, every time you record because I script mine is just the way I think. And it's important, I think, for people to understand that either works, you know, so I do zero editing, essentially, because I've pre scripted. I read my podcasts, but I've taught myself to do so in a way that it didn't sound like it. And, you know, that's just the way I construct my thoughts. It helps me to be concise. But I mean, you asked, How do you think of stuff to talk about? Or how do you sort of flesh it out? One of the benefits of maintaining my day to day Client Access? You know, the work that I do one on one with clients is that they're asking me questions all the time, and I'm forever writing them down. Right? Okay, I can answer that on the podcast that will be added into the next season. And for me, shifting to a seasons format has been transformational actually. So I'm in between, I've just finished season 14, I'm doing a few weeks of in between episodes now. And I'm starting to plan and write season 15. And that's worked really well. But it means that right, I'm going to deal with this subject at length over maybe nine or 10 weeks even. And sit down and write it and I mean, I can really, you know, get into some detail. And the audience just loving it the least that's what they're telling me. So it's working well for me, you just got to find out what works for you. And you? David Ralph 23:11 Well, it does. And you know, I scroll up and down your ratings and reviews on iTunes. And if no one's listened to the meaningful money podcast, jump over there and leave him a rating and review not that he needs them. He's got 16 in the United Kingdom. But this is one of the ones that I I'm going to reference and I hope you don't mind me referencing this bear in mind that you were saying, you've got to be careful what you say. And this was, it said offensive content of a really meaningful money offensive. And I found a recent episode genuinely offensive when Pete Matthew stated he wanted to take a baseball bat. And Steve some heads in after referring to some financial advisors as alpha males and dicks. Mr. Pete Matthew, is it did you do look back on that episode and go actually that was me being my natural self and you'd stepped over? Or do you look at that and go No, actually, I mean that and you can't please everyone all the time. I was mad, Pete Matthew 24:10 and not crazy mad. But I was really hacked off. And two colleagues of mine, I wasn't able to go this particular conference, but it was right in the middle of probably the biggest scandal in my world for a very long time were some lifelong steel workers in October and South Wales had basically been appallingly advised. And robbed of a lifetime pension savings. Essentially, they don't they were advised to transfer out of the perfectly good final salary scheme, move into personal pensions with massive numbers, in some cases, seven figure funds, which sounds great. But with horrendous fees being taken by the advisors, terrible commissions, just I mean, just appalling. And I could not believe that in 2017, that could still happen. You know, that's the sort of stuff that happened in the end, right in the shiny suited white, light coloured shoe wearing advisors world were a lot more professional. Now the regu

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Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Imagine the world without Walt Disney. A world where his beloved characters and songs never shaped your dreams, where magic and visual storytelling never sparked your imagination, and where no whimsical theme parks ever delighted your childhood fantasies. Walt Disney and his works are nothing less than legendary. From pioneering animations to spellbinding theme parks, his unparalleled vision continues to inspire generation after generation. People of all ages all around the world have been touched by Walt Disney’s legacy – which didn’t come easily for this innovative animator and persistent entrepreneur. Walt Disney’s life story shows no traces of dumb luck or free passes. Instead, it begins with a hard-working paperboy and ends with a humble film producer, who marked history once again while daydreaming on a park bench. Top Walt Disney Quotes to Awaken the Dreamer in You All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them. That’s the real trouble with the world. Too many people grow up. Early life with a love for art On December 5th, 1901, Walter Elias Disney was born in a small neighborhood in Chicago. He was one of five children of Irish, Canadian, German, and American descent. walt-disney-as-a-young-child Image: Walt Disney at the age of 1. Credit: History.com When Walt was four years old, his family moved to Marceline, Missouri, where his artistic talent was sparked by a neighborhood doctor who asked him to draw his horse. Young Walt instantly fell in love with art and intently developed his skills by copying the cartoons in his father’s newspaper. At seven years old, Walt decided to help his struggling family by selling his drawings to neighbors and family friends. At school, Walt Disney was rather inattentive. His teachers would often catch him daydreaming or doodling pictures of animals and nature. As he grew older, he picked up a knack for storytelling and would tell his classmates outlandish tales while illustrating on the chalkboard. At ten years old, Walt and his family moved to Kansas City where his uncle employed him to sell snacks and newspapers along the railroad. Being amongst trains all summer induced Walt with a fascination for them, a passion which can still be seen in his theme parks today. During the rest of the year, Walt would wake up at 4:30 every morning with his brother Roy to deliver the newspaper before school. They would make another paper round after school as well. The job was exhausting and Walt would often fall asleep in class, but he continued his paper route for more than six years to help his family. The Army and a short-lived business Walt Disney attended McKinley High School back in Chicago, where he drew patriotic pictures about WWI for the school newspaper. At night, he took illustration courses at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts to broaden his skills. At 16, a shy yet determined Walt Disney dropped out of high school and attempted to join the Army in their fight against the Germans. But he was rejected since he was still under the minimum age of 17. Nevertheless, Walt was insistent on joining, and so he tried again – this time enlisting for the Red Cross with a forged birth certificate. He was accepted and soon shipped to France where he spent the following year driving an ambulance. For all the blood and grisly injuries Walt would face on a daily basis, he found comfort in dreaming up new cartoon characters for his future career as an artist. In his downtime, Walt would give life to his unrelenting imagination by drawing on the side of his ambulance, covering it with cartoons from stern to stern. Some of his work was even published in the army newspaper. After his time in the Army had ended, Walt Disney returned to Kansas City at 18 years old with the goal of becoming a newspaper artist. His brother, Roy, got him a job at the Pesmen-Rubin Art Studio, where he met Ub Iwerks, a fellow cartoonist there. ub-iwerks-and-walt-disney-posing-for-a-photo Image: Walt Disney and Ub Werk. Credit: Inspiration X Not even a year had passed when a sharp decline in revenue pushed Walt Disney out of the job, the justification being “he lacked imagination”. This would have discouraged many aspiring artists, but not Walt Disney. With unwavering optimism and the support of his new friend Ub, Walt opened his very first business. Together, they formed Iwerks-Disney Commercial Artists. Sadly, they failed to attract enough customers and the business went under after only a month. Walt was dismayed, but far from ready to quit on his dream. All of my obstacles have strengthened me. You may not realize it when it happens, but a kick in the teeth may be the best thing in the world for you – Walt Disney First commercial success and bankruptcy As determined as Walt Disney was to achieve his goals, no amount of belief was going to get him anywhere without the money to fund it. So he got a job at the Kansas City Film Ad Company, where he produced short films using cutout animation. Meanwhile, at home, Walt began to experiment with a different animation technique using a borrowed camera and book. Later on, he tried to convince the ad agency to adopt this new technique – but was unsuccessful. the-story-of-the-life-of-walt-disney Image: Walt Disney and his camera. Credit: TIME Walt Disney soon decided it was time to quit talking and start doing, so he left the agency and opened his second business. Walt, Ub and a handful of animators would work long hours to produce short cartoons called Laugh-O-Grams. These seven-minute animations of modernized fairytales were shown at the local theater, attracting enough attention and popularity to keep their business afloat. Although funding soon began to decline, which pushed Walt Disney to work on the story of a live-action girl called Alice exploring an animated wonderland. Before he could finish it, his company went bankrupt and he was, once again, left with close to nothing. At 22 years old and already with two failed business ventures under his belt, Walt felt the only way he would succeed is if he believed in his dream implicitly and unquestionably. He then packed his suitcase – never leaving behind his favorite canned chili – and made the trip to Hollywood. A whole new chapter of his life was about to begin. A stolen rabbit and an optimistic mouse Walt met up with his brother, Roy, who had just overcome tuberculosis. They pooled their money to set up shop in their uncle’s garage in Hollywood. There, Walt dogged studios day after day in an effort to sell his Alice in Cartoonland series. He was rejected time and time again, until he heard from Margaret J. Winkler, a New York cartoon distributor looking for a fresh series. Walt and Roy were equally ecstatic and moved their operation to a rented room at the back of a real estate office. Walt took charge of animation while Roy operated a second-hand camera. They then hired two girls to ink and paint the celluloids. The rental was small and they lacked employees, but the front door proudly read “Disney Bros. Studio”, and that’s all the incentive Walt needed. Walt Disney’s series on Alice was well-received, which allowed the studio to hire more animators. His first hires included his friend Ub Iwerks and an inker who Walt would later marry. Their studio went on to create more animated shorts, and later gave life to a chipper, venturesome character called Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. oswald-the-lucky-rabbit-by-walt-disney Image: Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. Credit: Inverse Things were going seemingly well for the studio. Although five years later, Walt attempted to negotiate a higher fee for the Oswald series, only to find their distributor actually wanted to reduce their fee. It turned out that Winkler and her husband had poached Walt’s best employees and made them their own. He also discovered that they had stolen the rights to Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. He was now faced with the ultimatum of accepting a reduced fee for his work or leaving the studio. Walt chose to leave, along with his loyal animator Ub. Now at 27 years old, a disillusioned Walt Disney stared blankly out the window while on a train to Hollywood. Disaster seemed right around the corner for his company, but an idea was forming in his restless mind. Walt dug around for his notepad and fervently sketched his idea on paper. The result was Mortimer the Mouse, later baptized as “Mickey” by Walt’s wife. This character was special. He was more human, adventurous, and hugely optimistic – much like Walt Disney himself. He rushed his rather bad sketch over to Ub, who refined Mickey’s appearance while Walt worked on defining his character. Walt’s team was on board with this new cartoon, but would the audience like him? Snow White and the “ruin of Disney” Mickey Mouse first appeared in Plane Crazy and The Gallopin’ Gaucho, two silent films which failed to find distribution. But Walt was used to failure by now and knew better than to roll over. He and his team decided to integrate syncronized sound into a third short, called Steamboat Willie. With Ub in charge of animation and Walt lending his own voice as Mickey’s – the first ever sound cartoon hit the NY Colon Theater in 1928. It became an instant sensation. The reviews were beyond glowing and plans of Mickey merchandise began to bloom. the-original-mickey-mouse Image: Mickey Mouse cartoons. Credit: Cartoon Brew Soon enough, film studios began to line up with all sorts of deals for Walt. From experience, he never sold the rights to his prized Mickey. Along with his passionate team, Walt formed Disney Studios and went on to create a series of sound cartoons. Gradually, their humorous animations and lovable characters flickered across televisions all over the country. Six years and many successful animations later, Walt Disney continued to push the limits of animation by announcing his first full-length feature film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Everyone thought it was a terrible idea. His wife and brother tried to talk him out of it, but Walt took out multiple bank loans and spent the next three years producing his vision. His very own team thought the film would “ruin Disney Studios”. Yet Walt Disney persevered, and in 1937, the film became the most successful motion picture of the year. It won dozens of awards and turned enough profit to pay off every bank loan and then some. Materializing magic and creating a legacy For years onward, Disney Studios completed a string of popular animated films and introduced countless iconic characters. But Walt was a well-known ‘workaholic dreamer’ and his mind was brimming with even more ambitious ideas. On one particular Saturday with his daughters, Walt sat on a park bench eating peanuts while his girls played on the merry-go-round. As he watched them, he began to daydream of a place where parents and children could have fun together. His plans for a theme park began to hatch. It would be unlike any other, where people of all ages could explore and revel in fantastical experiences. disneyland-vintage-photo Image: Disneyland – vintage photo. Credit: Business Insider In 1954, the first Disneyland opened its doors to thousands of awaiting public. Despite the counterfeit tickets and abounding technical difficulties, Disneyland was an instant success and became known as a truly magical place. Now over 50 years old, Walt Disney had finally made his wildest dreams come true. His animation companies were flourishing, his characters were loved by many, and his productions were crossing borders into other countries. He had successfully transformed the entertainment industry and delighted people of all ages with his extraordinary vision. It wasn’t long before Walt began plans for a new theme park. Sadly, before construction was complete, his life-long habit of chain-smoking had finally caught up with him. In 1966, Walt Disney passed away from lung cancer. Although his unfinished venture was not lost. His brother Roy continued working on the theme park which opened in 1971, under the name Walt Disney World. Regardless of how many years have passed since his death, Walt Disney continues to live on as a central figure in the history of animation. Although his reputation has changed over the years, he remains known as a national treasure for the U.S. and a cultural influencer worldwide. Thanks to his vision and unfailing pursuit of his dreams, Walt’s legacy now transcends generations with memorable characters and influential films. His impressive record of 22 Academy Awards is one that has yet to be beaten. If Walt Disney were alive today, he would warmly reassure you that – from experience – there is no direct path to success. That your accomplishments depend almost solely on your dedication and willingness to persevere. He would also tell you that sometimes, the key lies within your most unexpected daydreams. If you can dream it, you can do it.

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Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

When we're young, we have an amazing positive outlook about how great life is going to be. But somewhere along the line we forget to dream and end up settling. Join Up Dots features amazing people who refuse to give up and chose to go after their dreams. This is your blueprint for greatness. So here's your host live from the back of his garden in the UK. David Ralph. David Ralph 0:25 Yes. Good morning. Good morning to everybody. Everyone across the world. Thank you so much for being here with me. Can we have a group hug, which is WeChat a little arms round and squeezing, squeezing, squeezing? You know, I I've gotten apologies to me, I have gotten an apology to make I recorded a show the other day, called opportunities are everywhere. When we reference Lucas Gordon photography, and I listened back to it this morning, I just dipped into one of my episodes. And that was the one I chose was so fast, I was a little a little little over enthusiastic. I don't know what was the matter with me. So if you listen to that, and thought, My God, you must be on drugs or something. I agree with you. I agree with you. I don't know why I was going at it so fast. It didn't feel like it at a time maybe. Maybe I was just excited. Maybe I was just an excitable man. And, and it came out in my voice. So I do apologise, I do apologise, I'll try to get back on to normal track because I do know, I get a lot of people across the board across the board across the world from abroad, listening to Join Up Dots. And some of them say, I don't catch all what you talk about. But I enjoy the passion. Well, I don't think that one you would have called or enjoyed the passion at all. So I do apologise, I do apologise. I'm going to take it slow. I'm going to take it slow. Why Today's episode is from a listener. And I hope you like these little little listens as well. It's not just interviews, we're trying to, we're trying to change it around, we're trying to put a little bit of element of what you want into it. So some people might only have a little bit of time. Going for a little 14 minute Join Up Dots. Others I've got hours and hours when go for that one, trying to blend it. It's all about you guys. Anyway, this is an email that came through from Marcus archers from New Zealand. And Marcus says dear David, David, I listened to your show sporadically. And I've always been partial to listen to it more. I think this is brilliant. This sounds like a native, doesn't it? Yeah. Can't be balanced. I don't know why I go off elsewhere. But I guess I'm easily distracted. One of the things that you can talk about is making time to be disconnected from your business and the world. And I struggle with this majorly. And I would like to become better. Over best. Right? I think I tell you what I tell you. I was there. I was wondering the field batting of sheep left right in the centre there. I was going to be in the new new Lord of the Rings field. That's how good at my accent was where? Why did David? Because I think Australians do that sort of everything's a question at the end of the day, David, I listened to your show, sporadically. And always think I should listen to it more. You having sounding good. It's all that I know what it means something that when your voice goes up at the end, like a question, but it's not a question. But it's a question. That's what the LC is a monster. Okay, yeah. being distracted and disconnected from the world. And it is a big, big problem. And I think it's it's the major problem. I know, my kids struggle with it. My I think everyone struggles with it. And I, I'm very good at disconnecting. But I also having an online business, I feel that poor, I feel that poor like, everyone really, you know, the world has never been more connected. And no matter where in the world you are, you can send a message to anyone in another part of the world, as long as you both have internet connexion. I'm a member in the sort of 80s in the 70s. Anyone from the United Kingdom will remember this, you'd go on holiday to Spain, and you'd have to wait a week for the newspapers to turn up. And so he was always a week behind the football results. He was always a week and one person would get the paper and you share it around with anybody else. It was like it was it was like a drug deal. But you go How can I have 10 minutes? In an hour? Can I have 10 minutes I newspaper done? I want I've gone back into that accident. I just like doing it. I really do. And yeah, but now you just got being and you just never never away from stuff is it's annoying, but it's the way it is. It's the way it is. Right. Also, I think one of the issues is that all these devices out there are designed to make you actually want to get hooked up to them, you can't fight it. They are like psychological experiments being paid on us. So that we will feel that desire. That's what it designed for. And as soon as you realise that Facebook and LinkedIn and Twitter and all the social media platforms are designed by people, I'm getting a lot slower today. And I I feel I feel more in control of everything. And they're in designed by people who are actively trading on our emotions, our stress levels, our need to not miss out on those kind of things. And once you realise that, and you realise that they're playing on a kind of internal algorithm, it's easier to stop. Okay, so some of the things that I actually do, right, I don't look at any games, well, I don't have any gadgets, I have my PC in Join Up Dots, HQ. And I have this morning laptop, which I'm going to get rid of because it started not logging on. And so I spend 1015 minutes trying to get it to work. So I'm actually going to get rid of it. So I'm now down to just my PC. So when I turn that off, I've gone. Absolutely no one on earth will be able to get me. But I've started to limit my amount of time I come to my office. And if I do come to my office, what I used to do is leave my computer on all the time, and I could just come along and boom hours easy to turn on. Now I'm turning it off. So I might come up here to read a book, I might come here to plan something. But actually getting into the online world, I don't unless I actually have to turn my computer on which once again is a little barrier for me to do. But you can certainly eliminate gadgets for one hour before sleep and after wake up. So my daughter will reach out and before our eyes even open in the morning, she's got her phone, and she's reaching and dragging it under the covers. So she's hi asleep, but she knows that she needs a phone. My wife needs a phone by the side of a bed. In case of emergencies. I go, what emergencies Are we going to have? Everybody that you love is basically in our house, or vape got people to support them, you know, you know, Batman woman, you know, getting a suddenly ever dot appear on the ceiling and you've got to go out and solve crime during the night. You don't need to have your phone on all the time. I just turned the notifications up. She doesn't talk about that. And I say no. Is that gonna be all the notifications because my wife's not good. We got a new radio, we got a new alarm by the side of the bed because she decided that the light of the previous one that we've had for a million years was too bright. It was too bright. It is keeping me awake. Well, if you hear the snoring, I don't think it is. But anyway, so we've gone to this other one that you can dim down. And she doesn't like the buzzer, because it sounds like a lowly reversing. You know they do that noise. And it actually gets louder. So you actually feel like you're gonna back to be run over and you sleep. And so you suddenly panic, but a law is just going to crash your head. But when you go, Oh no, it's always the alarm. So she doesn't like that. Now she's going for the radio. And now, the other night, she set the radio to come on at half past 12 in the morning, panicked. And they went out for God's sake, why is it doing this? Probably because you programmed it to do that. And then reset it again for half past two in the morning. So we had the radio burst into our life all the way through the night. But it wasn't, it wasn't the devices fault. It was the wives. I'm telling you that don't say anything, but it was the white spot. So what you need to do is reach out and turn off all your devices before and after wake up and have that set into your your routine. And turn off all your notifications. It doesn't only save battery life, it also saves you from a lot of distractions turn up all your push notifications from email, chat, social media, your application. If it's really really urgent, somebody will knock on your door for example, you know, people won't be drowning. I'm drowning, I'm drowning, I'm drowning. Send a text message to your best mate. That wouldn't happen. You would shout out Help me Help me, you know, urgent doesn't happen. And as we're talking about emergencies, do this as well. Because I get this a lot when people say to me, you really haven't got a phone, you haven't got a phone? Oh, no, I haven't got a phone. What do you do in emergencies? And I always say to him, when was the last time you had an emergency? And I go Oh, no, no, it does happen. I got When was the last time. And I would say to all of you if you're in that light? Yes, there's emergencies all the time. just jot it down and jot it down on a scale of one to 10. When you get something through, was that an emergency did that need it now. And you'll see you rarely ever. If anything I once broke down on the Alps, I was 12,000 feet up in a car with broke down, couldn't get it going. And my dad had an emergency phone, thank God because otherwise I don't know what we would have done that I think in my life is the only emergency I've ever had. Okay, doesn't really happen. Now, if you do need to have all these phones around you keep your phone in the drawer while you're working. Just just lock it away. And just try to think to yourself, now keep it there. And when you get that urge in your stomach, because you do you get a bit tense Do you get a bit twitchy just being said, Well, I'm feeling twitchy. I'm feeling twitchy, I'm going to go for another 10 minutes, don't beat yourself, I'm leaving it in there forever. Because you won't do that. That's like trying to lose 30 stone in a month. Just leave it in there go right now I can do another 10 minutes, I'll do another 10 minutes is now 1106, I'm going to wait to 1116 before I get back and start increasing it little by little 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, because you are trying to break free from an addiction. These devices are created. So you're addicted, it's the way they work. But you can't go cold turkey because it just won't work. Now, one of the things that I don't understand, but one of my mates says he does is he has only one device for checking social media. He can he can get Facebook, on your desktop, on your laptop on your smart phone, even on your Apple Watch. So you're checking everywhere, he now is it all through into one device. Now I've got one and it's called a man's name. I can't think what it is. But I put it in the links. And I haven't used it for a while. That's why I can't remember. But it has LinkedIn it has Facebook on it has all the notifications and I can go on to it. Within one second, I can see and turn it all off. So instead of going into Facebook and going into here and going into a or whatever, or having all the notifications, I don't have any notifications at all, I just have this one device, whatever it's called now coming was called is something to do with Roman is come to me. And I just log on once every three days or something and I have a quick look. And bang, it's done. Okay. Now, then the next thing that I would do, and these are the kinds of things I do, I have a thing called stay focused on Chrome, which I can programme my favourite websites. And we all have websites that were desperate to get into and we're going to check mines BBC Sport, are can go on to BBC Sport and find out where this football players being transferred. And that is not necessary. But I do. So I limited and I give myself 15 minutes a day on this website. And when it closes down, and it won't activate again till the next day. And you can set it up stay focused on Chrome. It's a free app. And it's brilliant. And as I say I look at it and I think to myself running out and running out I've got to do it bang is gone. And that's it. I just have to walk away from it. And so I prepare. And I think to myself, I have I got 15 minutes, yes, I have because what I don't want to do is it sort of waste of time, I want to make the most of it. Once again, your chance to do now somebody else told me what what they do, I have over sort of like the summaries of the websites, come to them in an email. So I can just scan down. I don't know how that's done, if anybody knows how that's done. But that's what he does. email comes through, it gives over sort of highlights of the website changes, and you can scan down and you can just keep up with it. Okay. And the last thing that I would say is go to emails once a day, okay, just just once a day that there's nothing, the problem is in business, people use it to talk, they don't use it to actually confirm, they just use it to communicate. So you're in there all the time sending two line emails back and forth, because you're too lazy to walk across the desk. If that is you then say to your colleagues, no, I'm not going to do this until 12 o'clock lunchtime, and bed, I'm going to open it up anything he wants saved about time, and I will respect or we can talk face to face. Because in the online world, email still remains the most personal way of online communication is it this is where the most important engagements happen, tweets and all those kinds of stuff it is. So bullet points, this is the big stuff. And so social media, like Friendster and multiply, have come and gone, all these kind of things, but email still remains and it always will. So limit yourself. Don't think that it's important. It's not if it is important in your company, your boss will come across. And if he's just sending an email expecting you to respond straight away, then it's not, it's not okay. So that there are kind of things Marcus, but I do. But the main thing that I do is I don't have a phone. I push everything now into messenger, and email. That's the only two ways that you can communicate with me away from that I don't look at anything. And I'm just aware of it. And I'm not a month, I still feel that that pole, that desire to check into these things. But by doing that, and just being aware and try to do 10 minutes and then make it 20 minutes and try to do an hour you will start breaking that addiction. And then you can do a day two weeks, you know, I can do a month at a time not look at anything. I probably could do longer than that now to just the way that I've organised it. So let me know Marcus, if you've managed to do anything and you try to stay disconnected and focus because it's a real game changer. And I will promise to practice my New Zealand accent. I really will. I'm gonna really Tommy best to do that. Until next time. Look out yourselves everybody. Thank you so much for being here and I will see you again soon. Bye bye. Unknown Speaker 15:48 That's the end of China. Unknown Speaker 15:51 You heard the conversation. Now it's time for you to start taking massive action. Unknown Speaker 16:01 QB create your life easy only life. Unknown Speaker 16:07 Will be back again real soon. Join Up Dots Join Up Dots Join Up Dots Unknown Speaker 16:15 Jolly Jolly.

Direct download: Opportunities_Are_Everywhere.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

Introducing Michael Dash Today's guest joining us on the show is Michael Dash, a man with a desire to throw himself into work and life to such a degree it almost brought an early end to his journey. He is an entrepreneur, business owner, author, speaker, coach, and philanthropist. # He has had a collection of unique experiences from “chasing the high” with his prior gambling addiction to overcoming adversity when his business partner conspired against him. He now has put this roller-coaster of a life into a new book interesting enough called  “Chasing the High“. Covering adversity through the entrepreneurial journey, he talks about his never ending pursuit of “chasing the high”, how he overcame his battle with addiction as well as legal battles with business partners who have literally tried to destroy him and his reputation and business. How The Dots Joined Up For Michael Throughout the book, he focuses on sharing his tips for battling adversity, how the smallest action can create the biggest result, and how uncovering a different way to think and approach life’s challenges can turn your entire attitude into a much healthier, grateful way to live. If you want to feel inspired to live your best life professionally and personally, “Chasing the High” is the book for you. As he say “My story resonates with entrepreneurs and professionals in the figurative ‘trenches.’ My mission is to use my difficulties and eventual rise to inspire them to find balance while building for success.”  So was he always on this path to self destruction and ultimate redemption or was their a defining moment that changed his life forever? And now with hindsight being a marvellous thing, can he see others following a similar path long before they can themselves? Well let's find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up dots with the one and only Mr Michael Dash Show Highlights During the show we talked about such weighty subjects with Michael Dash such as: Why Michael sees a huge challenge in the way that the world operates at such a high speed nowadays. People are always looking for the next stimulation.  We discuss the thrill that Michael felt placing a bet, never dependent on the result of the bet in any shape or form. When Michael was in the legal battle he was hooked on Adril, a powerful drug that causes lots of issues across America. and lastly............... Why people really don't care anymore in life, no matter how close they are to you. You are more likely to gain support from complete strangers 

Direct download: Michael_Dash.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

When we're young, we have an amazing positive outlook about how great life is going to be. But somewhere along the line we forget to dream and end up settling. Join Up Dots features amazing people who refuse to give up and chose to go after their dreams. This is your blueprint for greatness. So here's your host live from the back of his garden in the UK. David Ralph. Yes, hello there. Good morning to you. Good morning to you and welcome to an episode of a Join Up Dots called "Think like a freak?" Yes. Is it a good thing to think like a freak. Think in ways that other people don't? Or should we be following the herd? Well, Join Up Dots. I've learned many things. Oh, yes, I have. And through the process of doing my podcast, I found that more often than not other podcasters are making it too hard for themselves because they're just following suit from what other people do. And I love the fact of thinking outside the box and trying to do things differently, to get different results. Because honestly, if you go for what everybody else tells you, then, you're going to get what everybody else gets. And that's not what you want. If you look at all the Uber successful people out there, all the inventors, all the explorers, all the creative folk, they've all done things differently. And more often than not at the beginning, they would have been told you can't do it like that. You can't do it like it that. Well, in today's episode, I'm going to teach you how to think like a freak with a few hot dogs, and a story of a Japanese guy called Kobe, And he did something quite remarkable. A few years back, and he's still doing it quite remarkably today. And quite honestly, you look at him, and you look at his results and you think, "How did it happen?" How did it happen? Well, he did things his own way. He thought like a freak, and he found a way of beating all the competition. And that's what I want to prove to you today. So sit back and listen to another story, yes, another story teaching you about Kobe and the hot dog eating contest. Now, today's story is about a Japanese college student who did something remarkable in the kind of unremarkable field now I didn't even know you could do this kind of stuff. But he took on the sort of challenge that most of us wouldn't dream about or even want to. And absolutely smashed it. Now, in the autumn of 2000 a young man who will be come to known as Kobe. Because he's got a very hard name to pronounce. Was studying economics, Youkagi University, i assume that is in Japan. And he lived with his girlfriend Kumi. So it's Kobe and Kumi, and they lit the apartment by candles since they could no longer afford the electricity bill. And neither of them came from a family of significant means Kobe's father was a disciple at a Buddhist temples giving tours about his history, and they were behind on the rent as well. So things weren't good. Now his girlfriend Kumi heard about a contest that paid five grand to the winner. Without telling Kobi, she sent in a postcard to sign him up. It was a televised eating competition. Now, this was on the surface a stupid thing to do. Because Kobe wasn't gluttonous in the least. He is a small bloke, he had a slight build and stood barely five foot eight. He did however, have a strong stomach and a good appetite. As a child, he always cleaned his plate and sometimes the sisters plates too, and it also believe that size could be overrated. Now one of his childhood heroes was a great sumo champion, who was known as the wolf who was relatively light but compensated with superior technique. He overcome the big fatties by doing things in a different way, which is what the story is all about. Now, Kobi reluctantly agreed to enter the contest and he's only chance to was that out think the competition, because these guys had been over eating for years and years and years, so they were used to it. Now at university, he'd been learning about game theory, and now it came in handy. The contest would have four stages boiled potatoes, followed by a seafood bowl, Mongolian mutton BBQ and noodles. Now only the top finishes from each stage would advanced. So Kobi studied earlier multistage eating contest, and he saw that most competitors went so hard in the early rounds. That even if they did advance they were too exhausted and stuffed to do well in the final so it was a compete waste of time. So his strategy was to conserve energy and stomach capacity by eating just enough at each stage to qualify for the next. Now this isn't rocket science, of course. But then these competitors weren't rocket scientists either. They've been doing what they've seen other people do for years and years and years. Now in the final round, Kobe, who had done very well by keeping this technique up, channelled his boyhood Sumo hero and wolfed down enough noodles to win the 5000 Prize and the lights went back on in Kobe's and Kumi's his apartment there was lovemaking under fluorescent strips or whatever they were doing. It was good time in Kobe and Kumi life. Now there was more money to be made in Japanese eating contest. But Kobe having taste amateur success was eager to go pro. So he said his sights on the Super Bowl of competitive eating as a sport is known, the Nathan's famous fourth ofJuly international hot dog eating contest. Now for some four decades. This apparently has been held at Coney Island in New York City, and the New York Times and others had written the contest all the way back to 1916. So it's been going for years and years and years, and it routinely draws more than 1 million viewers on ESPN who wants to see a line of Americans shoving hotdogs down their throat as quickly as possible. Now, the rules are simple. A contestant has to eat as many hot dogs and buns known as HDB as they can in 12 minutes and any HDB or portion thereoff already in the eaters mouth when the final bell rang would count towards his total as long as he swallowed it eventually. Now an eater could be disqualified however, if during the contest a significant amount of HDB that had gone into his mouth came back out. Yes, known in the sport as a reversal of fortune. Now condiments were allowed, but no serious competitor would bother. Beverages were also allowed any kind in unlimited quantity, and in 2001 when Kobe decided to enter, the record stood now get this right at a mind boggling 25 and an eighth HDB in 12 minutes 25. Now at home in Japan, he practised a course. And he had a hard time finding regulation hot dogs. So he used sausages made from minced fish, and instead of buns, he cut up loaves of bread. Now for months, he trained in obscurity. And he arrived at Coney Island in obscurity as well. Nobody knew him. A year earlier the top three four finishers were all Japanese. The rabbit, he held the world record, but this newcomer was not considered a threat. So at some point, he was a high school student. They just laughed at him. One contestant mocked him "Your legs are thinner than my arms." Now. How did he do? How do you think that Kobe did? Well in his very first Coney Island contest. He smoked a field and set a new world record. How many hot dogs and buns would you guess? Yeah, right. The record remember was 25 and an eighth. So what you're going to go with? What you're gonna go with 27. 28 that'd be pretty good. That'd be more than a 10% gain over the old record. Now if you wanted to make a really aggressive guess you might suppose a 20% gain go for 30. But, this little guy with the skinny legs, he ate 50. That's more than four hot dogs and buns per minute, for 12 straight minutes. This slender, 23 year old Kobe full name because we give him his full name because he's done so well Kobayashi had essentially doubled the world record. Now just think about that margin of victory. The Coney Island hotdog contest isn't you know, as famous as the 100 metres run. But his feet in perspective is truly astonishing. This is like getting Usain Bolt to run his race, which was 9.58 seconds at the moment. And he would be taking it down to 4.87 seconds. Running of roughly 46 miles per hour. So he's taken that to like Greyhound or Cheetah standard. Now it's never going to happen. But Kobe did that. Now in his equivalent race he did that. And how did he do that? Well, all of us should be thinking outside the box and doing things a little differently. If we want to get the best results. And sometimes it's copying other people and other times it's doing our own thing. But more often than not, people will just follow suit on what other people do. So our hero Kobayashi. He had just demolished the world record eating hot dogs or hdb's, as we know, them. By eating over 50 in 12 straight minutes. So how did he do it? And how did he win again the following year, and the next four years to pushing the record to 53 and three quarter HDB. Now no past champion at one more than three times much less six in a row. But it wasn't just the winning or the margin of victory that set him apart. The typical competitive eater looked as if he could gobble down Kobayashi himself. He was the kind of man famous in his fraternity house for consuming two entire pizzas and a six pack at one sitting. Meanwhile, our hero was softly spoken, playful and analytical. He was a little guy but he became an international superstar. And in Japan, the enthusiasm for eating contest cooled after a schoolboy choked to death imitating his heroes. Now, it's not good, but Kobe actually found plenty of competition elsewhere setting records in hamburgers, Twinkies, lobster rolls, fish tacos, and more. And a rare defeat came in a one on one TV event in roughly 2.5 minutes. Kobeyshe ate 31 bunless hot dogs, but he's opponent ate 50 . The opponent was a half tonne Kodiak bear. Now, you can see this guy is doing rather well for himself. And initially, his dominance a Coney Island was perplexing, some rivals thought he was cheating. Perhaps he took a muscle relaxant or some other foreign substance to quell the gag reflex. How can he get so many hot dogs right down his mouth. Now it was rumoured to have even swallowed stones to expand his stomach. And there were even whispers yes whispers that Kobayashi represented a Japanese Government plot to humiliate the Americans at a contest held on Independence Day, no less. The conspiracy theories were bound. And they even went so far to actually say that Japanese doctors had surgically implanted a second stomach. Now, none of these charges seem to be true. So how did he? How was he so much better, but everyone else? And this is the lesson that we've been leading up to over the last two days. This is what I want you to start thinking. Now. Scientists met with him on several occasions to try to answer that question. And the first meeting took place one summer evening in New York over dinner in a very small restaurant. And our hero ate daintily, just a small green salad, english Breakfast tea, a bit of duck breast with no sauce. It was hard to imagine, that he was the same guy that was shoving hot dogs in his mouth time and time again. Now, this is how he did it. What he did first of all, was he observed that most Coney Island eaters used a similar strategy, which was not really much of a strategy at all, it was essentially a sped up version of how the average person eats a hot dog at a backyard barbecue. What he noticed was they would pick it up, cram it in their mouth as much as possible the dog and the bun, chew from end to end and then glug some water to wash it down. Now, looking at that he wondered if there was a better way, where it seems to me there's a better way. Now nowhere was it written for instance, that a dog must be eaten end to end. This is just how everybody's always done it. He's first experiment was simple. What would happen if he broke the dog and been in half before eating? Now, this he found afforded more options for chewing and loading, ie shoving it in his mouth. And it also his hands do some of the work that would otherwise occupy his mouth. Now this manoeuvre would come to be known as the Solomon method after the biblical King Solomon, who settled a maternity dispute by threatening to slice a baby into two pieces. Yeah, getting a bit serious here. It's eating a bloody hot dog, nothing more than that anyway. Now, Kobeashye now questioned another conventional practice eating the dog and bun together. Now it wasn't surprising that everyone did this, the dogs nested there, it's in there, comfortably held in the bun. And when we eat for pleasure, we kind of eat the two together, it's a combination of taste. But he wasn't eating for pleasure. Now chewing a dog and bun together he discovered created a density conflict, there was too much kind of stuff in his mouth. And so what he did instead was he started removing the dog from the bun. Now he fed himself a handful of bunless dogs, broken in half, followed by around the buns. It was like a one man factory working towards a kind of specialisation, that had made economists hearts beat faster since the days of Adam Smith. So he's totally changing the way things are done. Now as easily as he was able to swallow the hotdog, you imagine big sort of sausage thing sliding down your throat. Liked a train dolphin, he's very good at doing that. What he struggled with was the bun. Now the bun, was kind of doughyy and just filled up his mouth very difficult to swallow. So what he started to do was while he was feeding the sausages, or the hot dog, dow his throat, he would get the band, and he would squeeze it in to the water. He would squeeze the bun into the water, make it all sort of soggy. So then, when he squeezed most of the excess water out and shoved it in his mouth, this would actually slide down easier. Now the brilliant thing about this was when he didn't have to stop to have a drink at the end other competitors, because he was always getting his liquid at the same go. Now, he also spiked the water with vegetable oil to see if that would help swallowing now, that didn't really work. But he's experimentation was endless. And he videotaped the training sessions, and recorded all these data in a spreadsheet, hunting for inefficiencies and lost milliseconds. Now, do we do this in our life? Do we look at how we're doing? Do we look at where we can save time? Of course we don't. But he did. And that's why you're going to do it, you're going to think like a freak. Now what he also did was experimented with pace. Was it better to go hard, the first four minutes, ease off during the middle four and sprint towards the end? Or maintain a steady pace through out, he tried everything. And he found a fast start was the best way of doing it, he found that getting a lot of sleep was especially important. So was weight training, strong muscles aided in eating and helping him and he did everything he could to change what they were doing for years and years and years to find a better way. And when he put it all together, he found that he's physical preparations could produce an elevated mental state to in ordinary cases, he said,"eating so much for 10 minutes, the last two minutes are the toughest moments and you worry. But if you get great concentration, then it's enjoyable, you feel pain and suffering. However, as you feel it, you feel more excited. And that's when the highness is upon you. " So let's think about that. Right? So we now know how he's done that. And he knows that the end of his journey was the hardest. That was the bit way when he really had to push through and get it over the finishing line. So the reason we've been talking about that story was look at your own life, are you just replicating what everybody else is doing? Because if that's the case, you only going to get the same results? Why don't you look at things, break it down and think to yourself, maybe I can do this quicker? Maybe there's a better way of doing this? Why am I doing this? Now in Join Up Dots land? There's a lot of stuff that podcasters tell me "are you doing this are you doing that are you posting on Instagram" Are you do talk to any of it can't be bothered, and I don't see the point in it. But what I do, I do very, very well. And that brings about the biggest results. And the more you do, what brings about the biggest results, the more successful you will be. So start thinking like a freak, you've got a lifetime of thinking inside the box once you die. So start thinking outside the box, and like Kobeayshe. And I suppose in a very small way, like myself, you can create huge success in your life by doing things your own way. And believe me, there is nothing better than having a line of people going "How you doing this? How you doing this? And you just smile at them, and shove another hot dog in your mouth. It's rude to speak with your mouthful after all. Go out and do your own thing. And to summarise it all/ I suppose number one, watch and observe how others do stuff. Just watch. Just watch closely. And then try to find the small improvements trying to do the things, which will just bring a small incremental gain. The kind of things that the other people haven't spotted because they're just following suit from everybody else. And then ignore everyone else when somebody comes along "Says you can't do that. You can't do that. "Go. I'm a freak. I'm a freak. And I'm proud of it. And then test test test to find even more improvements in that process. And little by little you will think like a freak, and you will have a great time doing it too. Until next time. Thank you so much for listening to Join Up Dots. If anybody needs any help in any regard. Drop us a line you know where to get us. Join Up dots@gmail.com or Join Up dots.com You can find us in both places. And we will see you on the episode. Look out for yourselves. Cheers. Bye bye.

Direct download: Think_Like_A_Freak.mp3
Category:Entrepreneurs -- posted at: 12:00am UTC

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